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Archive for the ‘music’ Category

Childish Gambino

Thursday, May 31st, 2018
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10 Symbols You Missed in Childish Gambino’s ‘This is America’, Explained

Donald Glover a.k.a. Childish Gambino’s newest single “This Is America” is a catchy track, but what has people really talking is its music video.

The best videos are always the ones where viewers are enticed to go back for multiple views, and look a little harder for something they might have missed the first time around. “This Is America” is exactly that.

The video expertly tackles not just the warped landscape of the United States, but touches on cultural points from the past that have led us to where we are now. Gambino and the video’s director, Hiro Murai, are both subtle and incredibly blunt about getting the message across.

The video which takes place entirely in a warehouse is shot single-camera style, and touches heavily on gun culture and its ties to the African-American experience. Gambino’s dancing and smirking grin might give an illusion of joy at first, but even in that there lies a darker message.

Here’s the meaning behind the powerful references of the video:

1. Jim Crow pose.

Fifty seconds into the video, Gambino executes a hooded man who seconds earlier was strumming a guitar to the song.. As the man falls to the ground and is quickly dragged away, the gun is delicately handed off to a man who cradles it in a cloth. T

2. Minstrel show face.

One of the more subtle references that might be difficult for even the most “woke” viewer is Glover’s smirk at the camera. As writer Blue Telusma points out, this isn’t just Glover casually making a goofy face, but a nod at racism from the minstrel show era. “It appears Glover is also keenly aware of the dehumanizing, grotesque and cartoonish way Black people used to be portrayed to white audiences,”

3. The gunned down choir.

There’s no missing the message when Gambino pulls out an assault rifle and guns down the choir that is singing behind him. It’s a direct and in-your-face reference to the 2015 Charleston, South Carolina massacre in which white supremacist Dylann Roof opened fire in a black church. “Childish Gambino really made a reference to the Charleston church shooting that happened in 2015,” “He shows how mass shootings are normalized in America, even if you’re shooting up a place of worship.”

4. Death gets a police escort.

Throwing a white horse in your music video isn’t at first a groundbreaking move. The symbolism here isn’t meant to showcase the beautiful animal though, but rather a Biblical reference to the end times. Revelation 6:8 mentions Death riding a pale horse; in this case, we see a dark cloaked figure galloping on a white horse along with a police escort.

5. Viral violence.

It’s quick, but at 2:28 the camera pans past a group of teens casually watching the chaos and filming it all with their phones. the white bandanas over their mouths could be seen as a symbolism of a white supremacist system attempting to muzzle police brutality.

6. All the empty cars.

Older model empty cars populate the video. Sometimes they’re on fire, other times a door is merely left hanging open with the hazard lights flashing.  the empty cars represent the news stories of black men killed by police during traffic stops. the empty and abandoned cars could represent the stalled economic mobility of many black Americans.

7. The warehouse itself.

Yes, even the warehouse is believed to have a meaning. After all, Gambino and the director could have chosen any location to shoot the video, so why a warehouse? Some on social media believe that the greyish white warehouse could represent the structure that America is built on, one of white supremacy.

8. 17 seconds of silence.

At 2:44 the music cuts and Gambino mimics firing a gun before lighting a joint with the music coming back in at 3:01. That’s 17 seconds of silence, with some believing it is yet one of the video’s many ways of denouncing gun violence. Only in this instance, the 17 seconds of silence is done in reference to the 17 people who lost their lives in the Parkland, Florida school shooting.

9. The sunken place.

The video’s final scene has Gambino desperately running while being chased down by a mob of strangers is believed to reference the 2017 film Get Out. The “sunken place” that is portrayed in the movie is a concept described by the film’s writer/director Jordan Peele, as a marginalization of black people in the United States. “No matter how hard we scream, the system silences us,”

10. The dancing kids.

If you had a hard time concentrating on Gambino’s lyrical message because of the dancing, well, that was exactly the point. If Gambino isn’t dancing himself, he has a group of kids dancing behind him at almost all times, even in the middle of a riot.

The Cranberries

Wednesday, January 17th, 2018

a musical tribute to their music YouTube Preview Image

The Cranberries

Tuesday, January 16th, 2018

WHILE many of us have sang along to The Cranberries’ biggest hit song Zombie, few of us are familiar with the tragedy that inspired Dolores O’Riordan to write it. 

O’Riordan died yesterday morning in a London hotel room, on a day the 46 year old was due to record her vocals for a new version of her iconic hit Zombie.

Written during the band’s UK tour in 1993 and released the following year, Zombie is in memory of two children killed in an IRA bombing in Warrington, Cheshire.

Two bombs detonated within a minute of each other in litter bins on Bridge Street on March 20, killing three year old Johnathan Ball and injuring 12 year old Tim Parry who died five days later.

The IRA claimed responsibility for the attack, but insisted they had given two warnings prior to detonation and police had failed to act in time.

Moved by the violence, the Limerick singer penned the five minute song in a seething condemnation of the IRA and a visceral response to the death of two young children.

“I remember seeing one of the mothers on television, just devastated,” she told Vox magazine in 1994.

“I felt so sad for her, that she’d carried him for nine months, been through all the morning sickness, the whole thing and some prick, some airhead who thought he was making a point, did that.”

O’Riordan was particularly offended that terrorists claimed to have carried out these acts in the name of Ireland.

“The IRA are not me. I’m not the IRA,” she said. “The Cranberries are not the IRA. My family are not.

“When it says in the song, ‘It’s not me, it’s not my family,’ that’s what I’m saying. It’s not Ireland, it’s some idiots living in the past.”

“I don’t care whether it’s Protestant or Catholic, I care about the fact that innocent people are being harmed,” she told Vox. “That’s what provoked me to write the song.

“It was nothing to do with writing a song about it because I’m Irish. You know, I never thought I’d write something like this in a million years. I used to think I’d get into trouble.”

She later told NME in 1994: “[Zombie] doesn’t take sides. It’s a very human song.

“To me, the whole thing [terrorism] is very confused. If these adults have a problem with these other adults well then, go and fight them. Have a bit of balls about it at least, you know?”

This morning, Tim Parry’s father Colin Parry told Good Morning Ulster that he had been touched by the lyrics did not realise they were written about his son until after O’Riordan’s death.

“Only yesterday did I discover that her group, or she herself, had composed the song in memory of the event in Warrington,” he said.

“I was completely unaware what it was about.

“I got the song up on my laptop, watched the band singing, saw Dolores and listened to the words.

“The words are both majestic and also very real.

“The event at Warrington, like the many events that happened all over Ireland and Great Britain, affected families in a very real way and many people have become immune to the pain and suffering that so many people experienced during that armed campaign.

“To read the words written by an Irish band in such compelling way was very, very powerful.

“I likened it to the enormous amount of mail expressing huge sympathy that we received in the days, weeks and months following our loss.

“Proportionately a very high total of that came from the island of Ireland,” he said.

Cranberries singer Dolores O’Riordan dies aged 46

Tuesday, January 16th, 2018
The Cranberries vocalist was a very individual presence with a glorious talent

Even before she could talk, Dolores O’Riordan was singing. As a child she would regularly be propped up on a table at her Ballybricken, Co Limerick, home to sing for relatives. It was a uniquely affecting voice that developed into a lilting mezzo-soprano in her teenage years when she first started to write songs influenced by her early devotion to the music of Duran Duran and The Smiths.

A local band, then called The Cranberry Saw Us, were making small waves in Limerick city at the end of the 1980s. Word reached O’Riordan they were looking for a lead singer. Dressed in a shiny tracksuit and with a broken Casio keyboard under her arm, she cycled into the city to audition for them.

“Ok boys, show me what you got,” she said to the three male members of the band. Noel and Mike Hogan and Fergal Lawlor started bashing away on their instruments before O’Riordan played them a song she had just written about her first real kiss from a boy who then publicly dumped her at a local disco. It was called Linger. She got the job with the hastily renamed The Cranberries.

The beguiling mix of indie jingly-jangly guitar sounds fronted by a vocal line that soared and yelped as it bled raw, adolescent emotions was soon being listened to in record company offices in Ireland, Britain and beyond. While still teenagers, The Cranberries signed a deal with the Island Records label and recorded the debut album, Everyone Else Is Doing It, So Why Can’t We?

It was the start of a stellar career that would see The Cranberries become global sensations and sell close to 50 million records over the next 10 years. But success would bend and buckle O’Riordan.

Early years

Born Dolores Mary Eileen O’Riordan in 1971, she was the youngest of Terence and Eileen O’Riordan’s seven children and attended Laurel Hill Coláiste FCJ school in Limerick. An alarmingly shy person – who spent many of her early live performances staring at her shoes, fearful of making eye contact with the audience – O’Riordan soon found herself as the frontperson of an ongoing global concern, striding across concert stages worldwide, the focus of attention for stadium-sized audiences.

O’Riordan was the first to admit she was unprepared for fame and ridiculously naive about how the music industry worked. She didn’t have a metropolitan background, would never have the right answers for music journalists and was annoyed to find herself a figure of curiosity in glossy magazine features. She was portrayed as if she still had straw from the farm back home in her hair, a rural ingenue lost amidst the bright lights of rock stardom.

Within a few years of doing her Leaving Certificate, she found herself on the cover of Rolling Stone magazine, opening the front door to find Michael Stipe there with a present for her, singing for the pope, and duetting with Pavarotti.

Her songwriting gift was a potent ability to access her emotions and express them in chillingly lovelorn terms. What differentiated her work from her musical peers was a simplicity and a directness of approach. This wasn’t the detached, cool music heard elsewhere – O’Riordan’s biggest songs, such as Linger and Dreams, were the melodramatic emotions of her teenage diary set to music.

PLAYLIST

Wednesday, April 20th, 2016

http://www.deezer.com/profile/2169181/playlists

George Martin

Wednesday, March 9th, 2016

Fifth Beatle’ record producer dies aged 90

Sir George helped The Beatles achieve global success as the head of the Parlophone record label after hearing their demo tape in 1962.

David Bowie

Monday, January 18th, 2016
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have a good week-end !

Thursday, April 23rd, 2015

The first week-end of the holidays is always my favourite !

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music for your week-end !

Sunday, April 19th, 2015
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enjoy !

motivation !

Thursday, May 22nd, 2014
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The Hives “Come on”