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Archive for décembre, 2012

Merry Christmas

mardi, décembre 25th, 2012

Protégé : TS2- audio: Spirit in motion

vendredi, décembre 21st, 2012

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Protégé : TES- audio: the Paralympic Games

vendredi, décembre 21st, 2012

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Tourism: a beach in Asia vs Utah

vendredi, décembre 14th, 2012

 

For a link to a more complete view of the photo, click HERE.

And here is an ad made by the Utah office of tourism:

For a different version of this ad  in a much bigger size, click HERE.

Protégé : Far from the madding crowd: corrigé

vendredi, décembre 14th, 2012

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Protégé : Corrigé: To strive and not to yield

jeudi, décembre 13th, 2012

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Protégé : 1ES- document audio: my destination

mardi, décembre 4th, 2012

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TES: Electing a US president in plain English

mardi, décembre 4th, 2012

Image de prévisualisation YouTube

Script:

Every four years, Americans who are 18 or older have a big responsibility. Our votes decide who will become the president of the United States. Unfortunately, the US election system isn’t that simple. This is: “Electing a US president in plain English”.

It is easy to imagine every citizen’s votes being counted together on election day but this is not the case. US elections are not decided by the total or popular vote but individual states. Let me explain: it starts with your vote. On election day, you vote for president and their vice-president. You get one choice then all the votes in your state are counted. The candidate with the most state-wide votes becomes the candidate your state supports for president. This happens across the country until each state has selected their candidate. We end up with most of the 50 states and the District of Columbia voting to support one candidate each. But there is a problem: we can’t elect a president by just counting the choices of these states. US states are different. Consider this: California has about 36 million people; Kansas has less than 3 million. . We need a way for California’s choice to have more influence on the election because the state has more people. The question becomes: how do we make sure each state has the right amount of influence on the election? Well, we need a way to account for the population of each state. As an example, let’s consider my home state of North Carolina. Like every state, it is divided up into congressional districts that are based on the population. North Carolina has 13 districts, California has 53 and Kansas has 4. When it comes to a state’s influence on the election, the number of districts matters most. More population equals more districts equals more influence. The influence a state has in the election is measured by the number of electors. This number comes from the number of districts in a state plus the number of US senators which is always two. North Carolina has 15 electors while California has 55. When a candidate wins the voting in a state, they win that state’s number of electors. That’s why big populous states can be so important to candidates. Their electors add up quickly and the number of electors is what really matters. Here is why: if we add up the electors in all 50 states and the District of Columbia, there are 538 in total. The candidates’ goal on election day is to win the majority of 538 or 270 electors. Once a candidate wins enough states to reach the 270 majority, they have won the election and become the president elect. Yeah!

So let’s recap: your vote helps your state choose a single candidate. That candidate receives all the electors for your state. The candidate who can win enough states to reach 270 total electors wins the national election and becomes the president elect. Then, on the following January 20th, the president elect is sworn in as the next president of the United States and it all starts with your vote. Make it count.

Protégé : Document audio: Queen Elizabeth’s speech

mardi, décembre 4th, 2012

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Protégé : 2nde-audio document: the Empire State Building

lundi, décembre 3rd, 2012

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