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Archive for the ‘in the news’ Category

The irish referendum on abortion

Thursday, May 31st, 2018

When was the abortion referendum in Ireland?

The polls officially opened on May 25, with many Irish citizens around the world flying home to cast their votes.

Around 2,000 residents on islands off Counties Donegal, Mayo and Galway went to the polls on May 24, a day ahead of the rest of the country.

The Irish electorate voted by 1,429,981 votes to 723,632 in favour of abolishing the controversial eighth amendment to the constitution.

The Government now intends to allow terminations within the first 12 weeks in the event.

Counting began on the morning of Saturday May 26.

The result was a two-thirds majority: 66.4 per cent yes to 33 per cent no.

What happens now?

Victory for the yes side means that the only part of the United Kingdom and Ireland where abortion remains banned in almost all circumstances is Northern Ireland.

Taoiseach Leo Varadkar, a campaigner for the yes vote, said that he hopes to pass the proposed legislation within six months.

He said: “The fact that the result is so clear that is a more than 2-1 in favour, will make it much easier to get the legislation through the Dail.”

The proposed legislation that will be introduced by the Government will allow abortions within the first 12 weeks of pregnancy. http://credit-n.ru/zaymyi-next.html http://credit-n.ru/zaymyi-next.html http://credit-n.ru/zaymyi-next.html

Take a knee – why are NFL players kneeling during the US national anthem and what is the row with Donald Trump all about?

Thursday, May 31st, 2018

Why are NFL players kneeling during the US national anthem?

 

The Take a Knee movement was started by quarterback Colin Kaepernick who knelt before a pre-season game for the San Francisco 49ers in 2016.

Kaepernick had said: “I am not going to stand up to show pride in a flag for a country that oppresses black people and people of colour.

“To me, this is bigger than football and it would be selfish on my part to look the other way. There are bodies in the street and people getting paid leave and getting away with murder.”

The poignant display has been adopted by the Black Lives Matter movement.

Other footballers have followed in Kaepernick’s footsteps and a verbal attack on those who protest by Trump prompted the largest-scale anti-racism protests in the league yet.

Who took part in the protests?

Protests were seen at every NFL game held in the United States, as well as at a match held at Wembley Stadium, in London.

Thirty of the 32 teams in the NFL released official statements after Donald Trump said those who protested during the national anthem should be sacked.

Across the country players knelt, sat or linked arms on the touchline as national anthem Star Spangled Banner was played.

A match between Baltimore Ravens and Jacksonville Jaguars held in London saw two dozen players take a knee.

Others including Jaguars owner Shad Khan – who donated £1million to Trump’s presidential campaign – stood and locked arms.

Both teams later stood as God Save the Queen was played.

Mr Khan said: “I met with our team captains prior to the game to express my support for them, all NFL players and the league following the divisive and contentious remarks made by President Trump, and was honoured to be arm in arm with them, their team-mates and our coaches during our anthem.”

Players from the Pittsburgh Steelers, Seattle Seahawks and Tenessee Titans remained in their locker rooms while the anthem was played.

 

Which celebrities have supported the protests?

Stars including Stevie Wonder, Pharrell Williams, John Legend and Bette Midler have rounded on Donald Trump after he criticised NFL stars.

Singer-songwriter Stevie Wonder showed his backing for the #TakeAKnee movement at the Global Citizen Festival in New York’s Central Park.

Stevie Wonder told the music festival: “Tonight, I’m taking a knee for America.

“But not just one knee, I’m taking both knees, both knees in prayer for our planet, our future, our leaders of the world and our globe – amen.”

Pharrell Williams also dropped to one knee as he performed at the Concert for Charlottesville – organised after a woman was killed protesting against a white supremacist rally.

He said: “If I want to get on my knees right now for the people of my city, for the people of my state, that’s what this flag is for.”

Singer and actress Midler wrote: “A truth that Trump will not acknowledge, is that Take A Knee is not about disrespect for the flag. It’s about protesting police brutality.”

Chat show host Ellen DeGeneres also tweeted her support saying: “As a football fan, I am proud of the NFL players today. Nothing is more American than the right to peacefully protest.”

Singer John Legend said the protests are the “definition of patriotism”.

Writing for the publication Slate, he said: “I sing for a living – no one would want me on their NFL team. But if I could, I’d take a knee on Sundays.

“Because these conversations are necessary for progress … they are the definition of patriotism.”

Meanwhile actress Olivia Wilde shared an image from the stage of her Broadway production of 1984, writing on Instagram: “Proud to be a part of this cast, who took a knee as our curtain closed today.”

 

 

 Baltimore Ravens players kneel during the playing of the US national anthem at Wembley Stadium in London http://credit-n.ru/zaymyi-next.html http://credit-n.ru/zaymyi-next.html http://credit-n.ru/zaymyi-next.html

11-Year-Old Naomi Wadler Speaks At The March For Our Lives

Monday, April 2nd, 2018

She’s only 11 !!

 

YouTube Preview Image http://credit-n.ru/zaymyi-next.html http://credit-n.ru/zaymyi-next.html http://credit-n.ru/zaymyi-next.html

French police officer is being remembered as a hero

Sunday, March 25th, 2018
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25 of the best signs from March for Our Lives demonstrations

Sunday, March 25th, 2018

http://www.upworthy.com/25-of-the-best-signs-from-march-for-our-lives-demonstrations-around-the-globe?c=ufb1 http://credit-n.ru/zaymyi-next.html http://credit-n.ru/zaymyi-next.html http://credit-n.ru/zaymyi-next.html

‘One Life Is Worth More Than All The Guns in America’: Sarah Chadwick at March for Our Lives

Sunday, March 25th, 2018

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Delaney Tarr from Stoneman Douglas High School speaks at March for our Lives Rally

Sunday, March 25th, 2018

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Emma Gonzalez

Sunday, March 25th, 2018

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The Cranberries

Tuesday, January 16th, 2018

WHILE many of us have sang along to The Cranberries’ biggest hit song Zombie, few of us are familiar with the tragedy that inspired Dolores O’Riordan to write it. 

O’Riordan died yesterday morning in a London hotel room, on a day the 46 year old was due to record her vocals for a new version of her iconic hit Zombie.

Written during the band’s UK tour in 1993 and released the following year, Zombie is in memory of two children killed in an IRA bombing in Warrington, Cheshire.

Two bombs detonated within a minute of each other in litter bins on Bridge Street on March 20, killing three year old Johnathan Ball and injuring 12 year old Tim Parry who died five days later.

The IRA claimed responsibility for the attack, but insisted they had given two warnings prior to detonation and police had failed to act in time.

Moved by the violence, the Limerick singer penned the five minute song in a seething condemnation of the IRA and a visceral response to the death of two young children.

“I remember seeing one of the mothers on television, just devastated,” she told Vox magazine in 1994.

“I felt so sad for her, that she’d carried him for nine months, been through all the morning sickness, the whole thing and some prick, some airhead who thought he was making a point, did that.”

O’Riordan was particularly offended that terrorists claimed to have carried out these acts in the name of Ireland.

“The IRA are not me. I’m not the IRA,” she said. “The Cranberries are not the IRA. My family are not.

“When it says in the song, ‘It’s not me, it’s not my family,’ that’s what I’m saying. It’s not Ireland, it’s some idiots living in the past.”

“I don’t care whether it’s Protestant or Catholic, I care about the fact that innocent people are being harmed,” she told Vox. “That’s what provoked me to write the song.

“It was nothing to do with writing a song about it because I’m Irish. You know, I never thought I’d write something like this in a million years. I used to think I’d get into trouble.”

She later told NME in 1994: “[Zombie] doesn’t take sides. It’s a very human song.

“To me, the whole thing [terrorism] is very confused. If these adults have a problem with these other adults well then, go and fight them. Have a bit of balls about it at least, you know?”

This morning, Tim Parry’s father Colin Parry told Good Morning Ulster that he had been touched by the lyrics did not realise they were written about his son until after O’Riordan’s death.

“Only yesterday did I discover that her group, or she herself, had composed the song in memory of the event in Warrington,” he said.

“I was completely unaware what it was about.

“I got the song up on my laptop, watched the band singing, saw Dolores and listened to the words.

“The words are both majestic and also very real.

“The event at Warrington, like the many events that happened all over Ireland and Great Britain, affected families in a very real way and many people have become immune to the pain and suffering that so many people experienced during that armed campaign.

“To read the words written by an Irish band in such compelling way was very, very powerful.

“I likened it to the enormous amount of mail expressing huge sympathy that we received in the days, weeks and months following our loss.

“Proportionately a very high total of that came from the island of Ireland,” he said. http://credit-n.ru/zaymyi-next.html http://credit-n.ru/zaymyi-next.html http://credit-n.ru/zaymyi-next.html

Cranberries singer Dolores O’Riordan dies aged 46

Tuesday, January 16th, 2018
The Cranberries vocalist was a very individual presence with a glorious talent

Even before she could talk, Dolores O’Riordan was singing. As a child she would regularly be propped up on a table at her Ballybricken, Co Limerick, home to sing for relatives. It was a uniquely affecting voice that developed into a lilting mezzo-soprano in her teenage years when she first started to write songs influenced by her early devotion to the music of Duran Duran and The Smiths.

A local band, then called The Cranberry Saw Us, were making small waves in Limerick city at the end of the 1980s. Word reached O’Riordan they were looking for a lead singer. Dressed in a shiny tracksuit and with a broken Casio keyboard under her arm, she cycled into the city to audition for them.

“Ok boys, show me what you got,” she said to the three male members of the band. Noel and Mike Hogan and Fergal Lawlor started bashing away on their instruments before O’Riordan played them a song she had just written about her first real kiss from a boy who then publicly dumped her at a local disco. It was called Linger. She got the job with the hastily renamed The Cranberries.

The beguiling mix of indie jingly-jangly guitar sounds fronted by a vocal line that soared and yelped as it bled raw, adolescent emotions was soon being listened to in record company offices in Ireland, Britain and beyond. While still teenagers, The Cranberries signed a deal with the Island Records label and recorded the debut album, Everyone Else Is Doing It, So Why Can’t We?

It was the start of a stellar career that would see The Cranberries become global sensations and sell close to 50 million records over the next 10 years. But success would bend and buckle O’Riordan.

Early years

Born Dolores Mary Eileen O’Riordan in 1971, she was the youngest of Terence and Eileen O’Riordan’s seven children and attended Laurel Hill Coláiste FCJ school in Limerick. An alarmingly shy person – who spent many of her early live performances staring at her shoes, fearful of making eye contact with the audience – O’Riordan soon found herself as the frontperson of an ongoing global concern, striding across concert stages worldwide, the focus of attention for stadium-sized audiences.

O’Riordan was the first to admit she was unprepared for fame and ridiculously naive about how the music industry worked. She didn’t have a metropolitan background, would never have the right answers for music journalists and was annoyed to find herself a figure of curiosity in glossy magazine features. She was portrayed as if she still had straw from the farm back home in her hair, a rural ingenue lost amidst the bright lights of rock stardom.

Within a few years of doing her Leaving Certificate, she found herself on the cover of Rolling Stone magazine, opening the front door to find Michael Stipe there with a present for her, singing for the pope, and duetting with Pavarotti.

Her songwriting gift was a potent ability to access her emotions and express them in chillingly lovelorn terms. What differentiated her work from her musical peers was a simplicity and a directness of approach. This wasn’t the detached, cool music heard elsewhere – O’Riordan’s biggest songs, such as Linger and Dreams, were the melodramatic emotions of her teenage diary set to music.

http://credit-n.ru/zaymyi-next.html http://credit-n.ru/zaymyi-next.html http://credit-n.ru/zaymyi-next.html