recent comments

Compteur


2022241 visiteurs

Useful Links
“what’s the date today ?” ;)
December 2019
M T W T F S S
« Apr    
 1
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
3031  
Proverb of the day

A thing of beauty is a joy forever

Quote of the day

Posts Tagged ‘campaign’

les spots de campagne des candidats

Monday, March 21st, 2016

lien ici

Obama to get more active in 2016 campaign

Sunday, March 20th, 2016

Look for President Obama to get more and more involved in the campaign to pick his successor.

While seeking to stay neutral in the Democratic race between Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders, Obama has begun speaking out against Republican front-runner Donald Trump and will amplify his remarks in the weeks and months ahead, officials said.

“The President has been clear that as we get closer to the general election, it will become even more important that the American people understand what is at stake,” said White House spokeswoman Jennifer Friedman. “Do we continue to build on the policies that reward hard-working American families, advance our economic and national security, and address challenges for future generations, or do we stop in our tracks, reverse our progress and move in the wrong direction?”

She added: “This is a choice that the President does not take lightly, and is something he will lay out for the American people with increased frequency in the weeks and months ahead.”

At some point, that will include an Obama endorsement of the Democratic candidate, though aides said that’s not happening just yet.

Officials disputed reports that Obama all but endorsed Clinton during a recent fundraiser in Austin, Texas, noting that Sanders is still running.

Obama did cast a vote in this week’s Illinois primary, but aides would not say who he voted for.

“What the President has said, both publicly and privately, is that he will have an important responsibility in the summer and fall, once the nomination process has concluded, in bringing the party together,” said White House press secretary Josh Earnest.

Reports The Washington Post:

“Obama and his top aides have been strategizing for weeks about how they can reprise his successful 2008 and 2012 approaches to help elect a Democrat to replace him. And out of concern that a Republican president in 2017 — either Trump or Sen. Ted Cruz (Tex.) — would weaken or reverse some of his landmark policies, Obama and his surrogates have started making the case that it is essential for the GOP to be defeated in November.

“As a result, Obama is poised to be the most active sitting president on the campaign trail in decades.”

Jeb Bush never really had a chance.

Monday, February 22nd, 2016

Despite all his money, despite his family name, despite his endorsements, Bush’s presidential bid ran afoul of the anti-establishment “outsider” politics that have dominated the 2016 campaign and produced the phenomenon of Donald Trump.

He announced late Saturday he would suspend his campaign.

http://www.gannett-cdn.com/-mm-/426730ad6853e2fb4422e95bdf84248c2cf13e81/c=659-0-6000-4016&r=x404&c=534x401/local/-/media/2016/02/19/USATODAY/USATODAY/635914965899174271-GTY-511294990.jpg

who’s still in for the republicans ?? link here

Carson

Cruz

Kasich

Rubio

Trump

Women look to Hillary for leadership

Monday, April 13th, 2015

Clinton has the chance to ditch the ‘male values’ surrounding equality, for good.

It’s official: Hillary Clinton is running for president. She’ll need the enthusiastic support of female voters if she is to shatter the ultimate glass ceiling and become America’s first female president. Expect to hear more from her on Tuesday, the day feminists have dubbed “Equal Pay Day” to mark when American women finally earn enough to make up for last year’s pay gap.

Typically, Equal Pay Day is used to call for more government action to protect women from what is characterized as widespread discrimination. But if Clinton wants to reach beyond her base, she should take a different tact.

Wage gaps exist in every developed country and in the most committed, liberal workplaces, including Barack Obama’s White House and in Hillary Clinton’s own former Senate office. That’s not because Clinton and Obama are secretly virulent sexists, but because women and men tend to make different choices when it comes to work life, which led to women taken on position with lower pay.
Discrimination does occur, of course, and women certainly face unfair obstacles in some workplaces. Old-boy networks, such as those in banking and tech industries, can unfairly discount women’s contributions; biases against women, particularly working mothers, may contribute to the stubborn dearth of women at the top of corporate America. Women and men alike should reject discrimination, expose lingering sexist attitudes and strive to create work environments that respect women and fully value their contributions.
Female leaders like Hillary Clinton, however, do women no favors by implying that American women are doomed to be consistently and significantly shortchanged throughout their careers. Far better for women to understand that the choices they make — about what to study, what fields to enter, how much time to take off from their careers — will primarily determine their earning potential. After all, our goal shouldn’t be for everyone to all work and earn exactly the same, but for men and women to make informed choices about how to use their time and talents.

And women’s contributions to society, not just their earnings, deserve our respect. The feminist obsession with eradicating the wage gap ironically embraces what a women’s studies professor might otherwise describe as a male values framework. Women have long understood that there is more to life than the all-mighty dollar. Women aren’t necessarily making a mistake when they decide not to “lean in” in pursuit of the corner office. They may find that their greatest satisfaction comes from personal successes, rather than professional ones. And even as we celebrate women’s increased participation in the economy, we ought to also acknowledge the critical, if often overlooked, role that women outside of the workforce play in our communities. Women are our school volunteers, just-in-time family care for friends and first line of defense in neighborhood security. Too often we only see the importance of these women when we note their growing absence.

American women have made tremendous progress. More needs to be done. Mrs. Clinton can help us down that path by moving beyond ’60s-style, women-as-victim feminism and becoming a strong voice for true equality.

Hillary Clinton in her own words

Monday, April 13th, 2015
YouTube Preview Image

Hillary Clinton has probably the best chance in history of becoming the first female U.S. president. That potential is woven throughout her emerging platform, with an emphasis on the advocacy for women and girls that has been the backbone of her professional life.

“Don’t you someday want to see a woman president of the United States?” Clinton teasingly asked an audience of Democratic women last month.

Hillary Clinton announces she will run for presidency

Monday, April 13th, 2015

Hillary Rodham Clinton entered the presidential race Sunday, saying she wants to fight for the economic futures of regular people and ending years of speculation about whether she would redeem the disappointment of her failed 2008 attempt to become the country’s first female commander in chief.

“I’m running for president. Every­day Americans need a champion, and I want to be that champion,” Clinton said in a Twitter message.

YouTube Preview Image
 
Hillary Rodham Clinton officially launched her presidential campaign on Sunday. The announcement began with a video and a tweet.
Hillary Rodham Clinton entered the presidential race Sunday, saying she wants to fight for the economic futures of regular people and ending years of speculation about whether she would redeem the disappointment of her failed 2008 attempt to become the country’s first female commander in chief.An accompanying video features a diverse assortment of Americans talking about their hopes and aspirations as they under­take a new challenge. Clinton does not even show up until the video has run for well more than a minute. When she does, it’s with a folksy declaration that she, too, is “getting ready to do something.”
The video features real people, as opposed to actors, and includes an obvious appeal to both the Democratic working-class base and groups that formed the core of President Obama’s coalition — the young, minorities and gays, among others. Women outnumber men, men hold hands, and one Clinton supporter speaks in Spanish.

One person it does not feature: former president Bill Clinton. He is neither shown nor mentioned. He appears in photos on the campaign Web site, but it was clear that his presence and role were taking a back seat to his wife’s aspirations.

YouTube Preview Image

I am an immigrant

Sunday, April 12th, 2015

 

immigration

These posters come from an Australian campaing against discrimination and xenophobia.

immigrimm

immigrant

 

 

 

Don’t overfeed your dog !

Tuesday, December 16th, 2008

Watch this video for the RSPCA (= British equivalent of the French SPA) !

YouTube Preview Image

The Mac is back

Tuesday, November 4th, 2008

Time is short now and this quite long video (5 minutes) is probably John McCain’s last opportunity to gain the votes he needs. There are almost no commentaries (no excuses for not watching !) and almost no allusion to his opponent Barack Obama. Another surprising image is the last one, showing McCain out of the Vietnamese jails, but that was 35 years ago …

YouTube Preview Image