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Posts Tagged ‘candidates’

The conventions

Saturday, February 6th, 2016

Les conventions sont les grandes réunions des deux partis qui vont permettre de désigner définitivement les candidats à l’élection présidentielle américaine.

The Republican National convention will take place July 18 to 21 in Cleveland
Read more at http://www.uspresidentialelectionnews.com/2016-party-conventions/2016-republican-party-convention/#T33jdSrrLozTs7f4.99

Philadelphia has been selected to host the 2016 Democratic National Convention,
Read more at http://www.uspresidentialelectionnews.com/2016-party-conventions/2016-democratic-party-convention/#1yPcoCf6Z7P4x8zc.99

Portraits of the Democratic candidates

Thursday, February 4th, 2016

Hillary Clinton

Bernie Sanders

Iowa: Revenge of the outsiders

Tuesday, February 2nd, 2016

read more here

America’s voting system is crazy — here’s what you need to know

Tuesday, February 2nd, 2016

Why do U.S. presidential elections take so long?

America’s two main political parties — Democratic and Republican — choose their respective nominees through party-sponsored contests in each of the states and U.S. territories, a process that starts in February and takes up to five months.

Iowa and New Hampshire traditionally kick off the process early in the year, and then other states follow — but before that, candidates have typically spent a year laying the groundwork for campaigns in those regions.

Once each party has a candidate, they spend the rest of the summer and autumn campaigning until the general election on November 8.

Why do they cost so much money?

Also unlike some other countries, there’s no limit on how much you can spend. A presidential campaign can cost up to $1 billion — and that’s not even counting money spent by outside groups. It’s not cheap to travel across the country for two years or more, buy advertisements on television, and pay a small army of campaign workers.

What’s the difference between a “caucus” and a “primary”?

A “primary” is what most people traditionally think of when they imagine voting – people show up at a neighborhood polling place to vote for their candidate by ballot.

A “caucus” is very different. It’s a neighborhood event that requires several hours of active communal participation and debate, and takes place in the evening in a home or public space, depending on the size of the caucus location.

Why are Iowa and New Hampshire so important?

While they comprise just a tiny fraction of America’s voters, they play an outsized role in the nominating process by virtue of going first.

Results in these states provide a snapshot of a candidate’s popularity, organizing ability and momentum. Expect to see a few candidates who fare poorly drop out after Iowa or New Hampshire.

When will we finally know who the nominees will be?

We usually know who the party nominees will be by late spring, but they are not officially chosen until the national party convention in the summer.

The Iowa caucuses, explained

Tuesday, February 2nd, 2016

LINK HERE

Portraits of the Republican candidates

Tuesday, February 2nd, 2016

Chris Christie

Jeb Bush

Rick Santorum

Carly Fiorina

Marco Rubio

Ben Carson

Ted Cruz

Rand Paul

Donald Trump

The road to the White House

Tuesday, February 2nd, 2016

Americans will elect the 45th President of the United States on November 8, 2016. President Barack Obama is ineligible for re-election due to term limits established in the Constitution. The winner of the 2016 presidential election will be sworn into office on January 20, 2017.

Candidates

The following candidates are running for the Democratic, Republican, Libertarian or Green Party presidential nomination. They have been recognized by their party by (1) receiving an invitation to participate in a primary debate, (2) being included in national polls, or (3) making their party’s primary ballot in at least 75 percent of states that have held their filing deadlines. With the February 1 Iowa caucus right around the corner, 3 Democrats and 11 Republicans are still in the presidential race.

 

Click on a candidate’s name for a detailed overview of his or her policy positions and 2016 presidential campaign.
Democrats

Hillary Clinton

Bernie Sanders  
Republicans

Jeb Bush
Ben Carson
Chris Christie
Ted Cruz

Carly Fiorina
Jim Gilmore
John Kasich
Rand Paul
Marco Rubio
Rick Santorum
Donald Trump
Third party candidates

Gary Johnson (Libertarian)
Jill Stein (Green)
Potential: Michael Bloomberg (Independent)

The primaries

Friday, October 19th, 2012

Chiraz and Clara on the primaries The Primary Election (Chiraz & Clara)

The two candidates

Friday, October 19th, 2012

The two candidates, as presented by Carla and Océane

The Two Candidates

Comparaison des programmes des candidats

Monday, November 3rd, 2008

Allez, encore un petit article sur les élections ! Dans cet article du Figaro, vous pourrez comparer les programmes des deux candidats de manière interactive. Bonne visite !