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Posts Tagged ‘Hillary Clinton’

US presidential elections – 2016 resources

Monday, March 21st, 2016

on the excellent website LaCléDesLangues

les spots de campagne des candidats

Monday, March 21st, 2016

lien ici

Violence during Trump’s meetings

Saturday, March 12th, 2016

Statement: Donald Trump’s campaign on decision to cancel Friday rally in Chicago: ‘It would have been easier for Mr. Trump to have spoken, but he decided, in the interest of everyone’s safety, to postpone the event’ –

Sen. Bernie Sanders on Donald Trump rally incidents in Chicago: ‘Our supporters are responding to a candidate who has, in many ways encouraged violence’ –

Secret Service surround Donald Trump after person attempts to jump on stage in Dayton, Ohio

Hillary Clinton responds to Donald Trump, violence in Chicago: ‘The ugly, divisive rhetoric we are hearing from Donald Trump and the encouragement of violence and aggression is wrong, and it’s dangerous. If you play with matches, you’re going to start a fire you can’t control. That’s not leadership.

Hillary Clinton on violence at Donald Trump rally: ‘The divisive rhetoric we are seeing should be of grave concern to us all… Violence has no place in our politics, we should use our words and deeds to bring Americans together’

Gov. John Kasich says Donald Trump has created ‘toxic environment’

Marco Rubio says if Donald Trump is nominee, ‘the Republican Party’s going to be defined by’ violence

Michael Bloomberg Says He Won’t Run for President in 2016

Wednesday, March 9th, 2016

Michael Bloomberg, the billionaire former three-term mayor of New York, said he’s decided against entering the 2016 presidential race, removing one of the remaining uncertainties in what already has been an unusual and unpredictable election year.

Bloomberg, 74, who had said the 2016 presidential campaign has been marred by appeals to extremism and was an insult to voters, was expected to spend a sizable amount of his own fortune if he entered the race. Bloomberg is the founder and majority owner of Bloomberg News parent Bloomberg LP.

Bloomberg also said his candidacy risked dividing the vote and throwing the election into Congress. “As the race stands now, with Republicans in charge of both Houses, there is a good chance that my candidacy could lead to the election of Donald Trump or Senator Ted Cruz. That is not a risk I can take in good conscience,” Bloomberg wrote.

There have been several prominent independent or third-party presidential candidates during the past century, most recently Ralph Nader in 2000, Ross Perot in 1992 and 1996, and John Anderson in 1980. Perot won 19 percent of the popular vote nationwide in 1992, but carried no states and won no electoral votes. The last such candidate to secure any electoral votes was segregationist George Wallace in 1968.

At a town hall event in Detroit televised by Fox News, Sanders offered muted reaction to Bloomberg’s announcement.

“That’s his decision,” Sanders said. The Democrat said it’s a “bad idea for American democracy that the only people who feel they can run for president” are wealthy.

March 5th Election Results

Sunday, March 6th, 2016

Trump and Cruz were Saturday’s big winners, claiming two victories each in four Republican state contests. Trump won the Kentucky caucus and Louisiana primary while Cruz claimed caucus wins in Kansas and Maine.

Despite the support of many elected officials, Rubio’s lackluster performance Saturday raises serious questions about his viability in the race. He finished in third place in every state that voted Saturday except Maine, where The Associated Press projected him to finish behind Kasich.

Rubio said the upcoming schedule of primaries would be “better for us,” and renewed his vow to win his home state of Florida, claiming all 99 delegates there on March 15.

Saturday’s races saw high voter turnout in several states. Turnout in Republican presidential caucuses in Kansas exceeded the party’s most optimistic predictions.

Party leaders — including 2012 nominee Mitt Romney and 2008 nominee Sen. John McCain — are fearful a Trump victory would lead to a disastrous November election, with losses up and down the GOP ticket.

“Everyone’s trying to figure out how to stop Trump,” Trump marveled about himself at an afternoon rally in Orlando, Florida. At the rally, the billionaire businessman had supporters raise their hands and swear to vote for him.

On the Democratic side, there was another divided verdict from voters. Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders notched wins in the Nebraska and Kansas caucuses, while front-runner Hillary Clinton snagged a win in the Louisiana primary.

“No matter who wins this Democratic nomination, I have not the slightest doubt that on our worst day we will be infinitely better than the Republicans on their best day,” Clinton said.

She also said she was thrilled to add to her delegate count and expected to do well in Michigan’s primary on Tuesday. But before that, she and Sanders will go head-to-head Sunday in Maine’s Democratic caucus where 30 delegates are up for grabs. Republicans will battle it out in Puerto Rico’s GOP caucus for 23 delegates.

Despite Clinton’s commanding lead in the delegate count, Sanders vowed to keep fighting until the Democratic convention in Philadelphia this summer.

Clinton and Trump near the promised land

Wednesday, March 2nd, 2016

Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump entered Super Tuesday and its dozen contests as their parties’ front-runners. Now that the dust has settled, has that changed?

Not at all.

The path to stop Trump? It’s a narrow one

Donald Trump waves as he steps on stage to speak at

The Republican establishment is not ready to embrace him. His top challengers, by all appearances, remain determined to stop him and are getting increasingly personal and aggressive in their tactics.

There’s the fact that instead of having just one determined rival, he still has at least two in Marco Rubio and Ted Cruz, to say nothing of John Kasich and Ben Carson, who continue to pick up votes, making it possible for the New York billionaire to win contests decisively with his existing base of support. And those Trump supporters, if we’ve learned anything in this campaign, aren’t going anywhere, no matter what.

Hillary Clinton addresses supporters at her Super Tuesday

Clinton entered the 2016 presidential race as a prohibitive front-runner to become the Democratic nominee. Then, unexpectedly, Bernie Sanders emerged as not only as viable alternative but a threat to win many of the early states — a belief he validated by losing Iowa by the narrowest of margins, then taking New Hampshire in a landslide. But even before the first votes were cast, it was long believed, no matter what, that the March 1 slate of contests, mostly in the South with large African-American electorates, would shore up Clinton’s candidacy and stem whatever momentum Sanders may have acquired.

The math for Sanders has always been unkind. Super Tuesday made it worse.

Is there anything Sanders can do?

Bernie Sanders arrives at a primary night rally in

he’d need to start winning big to either overcome that lead or somehow convince superdelegates to switch their allegiances — and both scenarios seem pretty unlikely.

Marco Rubio finally gets a win in Texas !

Marco Rubio waves to supporters at a campaign rally

Portraits of the Democratic candidates

Thursday, February 4th, 2016

Hillary Clinton

Bernie Sanders

Iowa: Revenge of the outsiders

Tuesday, February 2nd, 2016

read more here

The road to the White House

Tuesday, February 2nd, 2016

Americans will elect the 45th President of the United States on November 8, 2016. President Barack Obama is ineligible for re-election due to term limits established in the Constitution. The winner of the 2016 presidential election will be sworn into office on January 20, 2017.

Candidates

The following candidates are running for the Democratic, Republican, Libertarian or Green Party presidential nomination. They have been recognized by their party by (1) receiving an invitation to participate in a primary debate, (2) being included in national polls, or (3) making their party’s primary ballot in at least 75 percent of states that have held their filing deadlines. With the February 1 Iowa caucus right around the corner, 3 Democrats and 11 Republicans are still in the presidential race.

 

Click on a candidate’s name for a detailed overview of his or her policy positions and 2016 presidential campaign.
Democrats

Hillary Clinton

Bernie Sanders  
Republicans

Jeb Bush
Ben Carson
Chris Christie
Ted Cruz

Carly Fiorina
Jim Gilmore
John Kasich
Rand Paul
Marco Rubio
Rick Santorum
Donald Trump
Third party candidates

Gary Johnson (Libertarian)
Jill Stein (Green)
Potential: Michael Bloomberg (Independent)

Women look to Hillary for leadership

Monday, April 13th, 2015

Clinton has the chance to ditch the ‘male values’ surrounding equality, for good.

It’s official: Hillary Clinton is running for president. She’ll need the enthusiastic support of female voters if she is to shatter the ultimate glass ceiling and become America’s first female president. Expect to hear more from her on Tuesday, the day feminists have dubbed “Equal Pay Day” to mark when American women finally earn enough to make up for last year’s pay gap.

Typically, Equal Pay Day is used to call for more government action to protect women from what is characterized as widespread discrimination. But if Clinton wants to reach beyond her base, she should take a different tact.

Wage gaps exist in every developed country and in the most committed, liberal workplaces, including Barack Obama’s White House and in Hillary Clinton’s own former Senate office. That’s not because Clinton and Obama are secretly virulent sexists, but because women and men tend to make different choices when it comes to work life, which led to women taken on position with lower pay.
Discrimination does occur, of course, and women certainly face unfair obstacles in some workplaces. Old-boy networks, such as those in banking and tech industries, can unfairly discount women’s contributions; biases against women, particularly working mothers, may contribute to the stubborn dearth of women at the top of corporate America. Women and men alike should reject discrimination, expose lingering sexist attitudes and strive to create work environments that respect women and fully value their contributions.
Female leaders like Hillary Clinton, however, do women no favors by implying that American women are doomed to be consistently and significantly shortchanged throughout their careers. Far better for women to understand that the choices they make — about what to study, what fields to enter, how much time to take off from their careers — will primarily determine their earning potential. After all, our goal shouldn’t be for everyone to all work and earn exactly the same, but for men and women to make informed choices about how to use their time and talents.

And women’s contributions to society, not just their earnings, deserve our respect. The feminist obsession with eradicating the wage gap ironically embraces what a women’s studies professor might otherwise describe as a male values framework. Women have long understood that there is more to life than the all-mighty dollar. Women aren’t necessarily making a mistake when they decide not to “lean in” in pursuit of the corner office. They may find that their greatest satisfaction comes from personal successes, rather than professional ones. And even as we celebrate women’s increased participation in the economy, we ought to also acknowledge the critical, if often overlooked, role that women outside of the workforce play in our communities. Women are our school volunteers, just-in-time family care for friends and first line of defense in neighborhood security. Too often we only see the importance of these women when we note their growing absence.

American women have made tremendous progress. More needs to be done. Mrs. Clinton can help us down that path by moving beyond ’60s-style, women-as-victim feminism and becoming a strong voice for true equality.