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Posts Tagged ‘new technologies’

special thanks to …

Friday, May 31st, 2013

a new revolution

Saturday, May 25th, 2013

http://www.guardian.co.uk/smart-revolution

the idea of progress : new technologies / home / environment + BTS SIO ( http://www.guardian.co.uk/technology)

(various documents, articles to pick from for you oral exam)

Google office conference

3D printer makes edible food

Saturday, May 25th, 2013

–> the idea of progress !

print_food.top.jpg

NEW YORK (CNNMoney) — A 3D food printer sounds like something out of Star Trek, but it’s not out of this world. It’s up and running at the French Culinary Institute in Manhattan — and in five years, it could be in your home.

As part of a project at Cornell University, a group of scientists and students built a 3D printer and began testing it out with food. The device attaches to a computer, which works as the “brain” behind the technology.

It doesn’t look like a traditional printer; it’s more like an industrial fabrication machine. Users load up the printer’s syringes with raw food — anything with a liquid consistency, like soft chocolate, will work. The ingredient-filled syringes will then “print” icing on a cupcake. Or it’ll print something more novel (i.e., terrifying) — like domes of turkey on a cutting board.

“You hand [the computer] three bits of info: a shape that you want, a description of how that shape can be made, and a description of how that material that you want to print with works,” says Jeff Lipton, a Cornell grad student working on the project. Lipton is pursuing a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering.

The project came out of Cornell’s [email protected] venture, headed up by associate professor Hod Lipson. Started in 2005, the project aims to create do-it-yourself versions of machines that can manufacture custom objects on-demand. The group started experimenting with food fabrication in 2007.

Lipton thinks food printing will be “the killer app” of 3D printing. Just like video games fueled demand for personal computers 30 years ago, he thinks the lure of feeding Grandma’s cookie recipe into a printer will help personal fabricators expand beyond the geek crowd.

“It’s really going to be the next phase of the digital revolution,” he says.

David Arnold, director of culinary technology at the French Culinary Institute, has been testing out the technology since October 2009. He loves the experimentation it makes possible.

“One of the main things I hope this machine will let us do is create new textures that we couldn’t get otherwise,” he says. “This is the first time I’ve really seen this happen.”

That could draw in chefs and restaurateurs. But Arnold also thinks a 3D food printer will have mass appeal.

“This would be a slam dunk for cookies at holiday time,” he says. “Anything that requires a high level of precision that people don’t usually have with their hands, in terms of making icing or decorations, this thing can perform amazingly well.”

Because it’s an academic project, the 3D food printer isn’t commercially available — yet. The [email protected] project has the blueprints for free online, and dedicated hobbyists can use them to build their own. One retailer, nextfabstore.com, offers an assembled version for sale — starting at a mere $3,300.

Entrepreneur Jamil Yosefzai plans to be on the forefront of commercializing the technology. His New York City-based startup, Essential Dynamics, is working on a version that can be sold to the first wave potential customers: pastry chefs and tech early adopters.

Yosefzai thinks his version of the printer will kinetically retail for around $1,000, but he expects that price tag to eventually fall to $700 or so. And he predicts that the technology could become a household staple within a decade.

“It comes down to comfort level, and that will expand as the [technology] goes more and more into schools and everywhere else,” he says. “Sort of like computers — the kids picked it up first, then the parents picked it up, and once everybody has an acclimation to it, they’ll be printing left and right.”

http://money.cnn.com/2011/01/24/technology/3D_food_printer/index.htm —> for the video (BTS SIO)

Surprise: Teenagers Say Facebook Isn’t Their Most Used Site !

Friday, May 3rd, 2013

–> the idea of progress

–> spaces and exchanges

http://psychcentral.com/blog/archives/2011/04/14/fomo-addiction-the-fear-of-missing-out/

http://www.businessinsider.com/most-used-web-products-tumblr-facebook-2013-1

http://news.cnet.com/8301-17852_3-57578858-71/teens-facebooks-becoming-more-meh/?subj=cnet&tag=title

http://news.cnet.com/8301-1023_3-57572154-93/why-teens-are-tiring-of-facebook/

the Apple car

Saturday, January 19th, 2013

60 seconds on the Internet …

Wednesday, January 4th, 2012

http://www.telepro.be/photos/article_news/60-secondes-high-tech.jpg

Modern Times

Thursday, October 13th, 2011

David Hockney : Fresh Flowers exhibition

Wednesday, December 15th, 2010

The first major exhibition of the artist’s work in Paris in a decade! Wih paintings made on an iPad and iPhone!

On display you’ll see a number of new paintings created on the iPhone and iPad, mostly using the Brushes app. Not only will the painting already finished be put on display, but Hockeny will be e-mailing in new ones during the time of the show so that they can be seen too. How very 2.0 and 21st century!

Hockney, who has been an important contributor to the Pop Art movement of the 1960s, has created some of the most memorable works of painting, photography and design of the 20th century

more on this exhibition :

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-11666162

Girls ‘becoming Facebook addicts’

Saturday, November 28th, 2009

_46739287_facebookgetty

Parents fear their daughters are becoming addicted to social networking sites, a girls’ school leader says.

Girls seem to be “permanently connected” to sites like Facebook and Bebo, president of the Girls’ Schools Association Jill Berry said.

This issue now tops the list of parents’ worries by some way, she told the association’s annual conference.

Mrs Berry also argued that girls’ interest in fashion should not be mistaken for being “shallow”.

The leader of the girls’ private school association said there was no contradiction in girls being interested in fashion and wanting to be seen as intelligent feminists.

“Girls can be highly intelligent and interested in being seen to be attractive – the two aren’t mutually exclusive.

“Caring about physical appearance and fashion and wanting to look good doesn’t have to be a betrayal of some feminist ideal. I love shoes but it doesn’t make me shallow. Girls can have fun and also be taken seriously.”

‘We hate x’

Mrs Berry, who is head teacher of Dame Alice Harpur School in Bedford, highlighted concerns about girls spending too long on networking websites.

“They [parents] worry about the addictive nature of networking sites and the fact that their daughters seem to be permanently connected.

“They ask us what to do about their daughters being on the receiving end of ‘We hate x’ sites or ‘honesty boxes’ where comments about each other can be posted anonymously,” she told the conference.

These problems had overtaken their concerns about the girls’ face-to-face contact in school, she said.

Mrs Berry added: “Our schools now need routinely to advise parents about internet safety, in addition to working to educate the girls and to encourage them to be responsible in their relationships on and off line.

“We do have to educate girls – we can’t simply protect them.”

A Facebook spokeswoman said: “It’s equally convenient to characterise TV and video game usage as time-consuming distractions.

“Yet there’s academic research that touts the benefits of these activities and services like Facebook. Regardless, it’s in the hands of users, to define priorities and decide how to spend their time.”

She added that Facebook had a range of safety tips to ensure users remained safe online.

These include, users being careful to only accept friend requests from people they know and to report any messages or profiles that look suspicious.

taken from

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/education/8362568.stm

Refining the Twitter Explosion

Tuesday, November 10th, 2009

There is way too much information on Twitter — lately, it defies navigation. In January, there were 2.4 million tweets a day, according to Alessio S. ignorini, a researcher.

 

Why should we care about information overload at Twitter? Isn’t Twitter about the individual experiences — a Tweeter and her followers — not the totality of millions of Tweeters around the world?

Twitter says it could unveil in the next few weeks — “geolocation” — holds such potential to make the Twitter rapids navigable.

The idea is to take advantage of global positioning systems on cellphones to allow Twitter users to include a precise location with each tweet. Users would be able, right off the bat, to limit their searches to tweets from a particular location.

“Proximity can be this proxy for relevance,” said Ryan Sarver, the director of the Twitter platform, who led a “fairly small team” of programmers who after a few months are close to completing the geolocation project. “We are about delivering the right information to the right people.”

Improvements like geolocation have the potential to make the Internet suddenly relevant to society as it is lived, not just relevant to what happens online. Mr. Sarver imagines features like “local trending topics,” a list of subjects popular in a particular area; or searches for happy hour in a neighborhood of Dallas that will intelligently link tweets about happy hours to the place they were sent from.

Because GPS will provide the ability to become very “granular” with locations, you could mimic through Twitter the banter at the local diner or a barbershop, by limiting a search of tweets to a two-block radius.

There is also the fear of loss of privacy and loss of security as once-local chats become globally public. That is why Mr. Sarver said Twitter would require two “opt in” decisions — at the profile level and again through the application.

For the technological optimists, the cures for information overload, in essence, are better filters and greater context. The more you know about a message — who sent it and

 

 why — the better you understand it.

Creating navigation tools for digital information is the next big challenge, said Erik Hersman, a co-founder of Ushahidi who has been in contact with Mr. Sarver’s team at Twitter.