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Posts Tagged ‘presidential election’

US presidential elections – 2016 resources

Monday, March 21st, 2016

on the excellent website LaCléDesLangues

les spots de campagne des candidats

Monday, March 21st, 2016

lien ici

Trump holds Arizona rally after protesters block road

Sunday, March 20th, 2016

Many protesters carried signs saying “Stand against racism.” They also chanted “Get this clown out of our town.” The demonstrators dissipated before any arrests were made, said Arizona Department of Public Safety Sgt. Ann FitzGerald.

Thousands of miles away in New York City, hundreds of protesters gathered near Trump Tower in Columbus Circle on Saturday to march toward the Fifth Avenue skyscraper the billionaire businessman owns and lives in, local media reported. MSNBC reported three demonstrators were arrested as the crowd tried to push into the streets of the bustling city.

The public crescendo against Trump has been on the rise at recent events. On Friday night, demonstrators clashed with police and supporters outside a Trump rally in Salt Lake City. Last week, the Republican front-runner canceled a rally over security concerns after protesters and supporters clashed at the University of Illinois at Chicago ahead of the planned event.

Trump was at the Phoenix Convention Center in downtown Phoenix on Saturday morning to tape an interview with Fox News personality Sean Hannity of Tuesday’s presidential primary in the state. Trump’s planned travel route from Phoenix to Fountain Hills was not known, but law enforcement was still blocking Shea Boulevard even though the protesters had left.

Speaking to MSNBC by phone, Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio, who was with Trump in downtown Phoenix, said he anticipated no problems reaching the site of the rally.

Many of those waiting to hear Trump said his blunt, sometimes offensive, talk is a big part of his appeal.

“I like that he’s blunt, that there’s no political correctness with him, that he says what he means,” said Tracy Walter, 45, a receptionist from Fountain Hills. She said she likes Trump’s political-outsider status and she wanted to be a part of this “once-in-a-lifetime event.”

“If he hurts somebody’s feelings, well, you can’t be like that every day. And I like his views on immigration,” she said.

Trump has maintained a comfortable lead in the Arizona polls over Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas, the second-running Republican in the race, and Ohio Gov. John Kasich.

Robert Kaiser, 67, a snowbird who lives in Mesa when he’s not in North Dakota, was among those waiting to hear Trump on Saturday. He sported a “Donald Trump President 2016 shirt” that reads: “Fire the Idiots, Help the Vets.” A pin on his shirt read: “Bomb the hell out of ISIS.”

“I like his shoot-from-the-hip attitude and I think he’s going to be a lot stronger for our military,” Kaiser said. “He’s not going to be as easy on terrorists as our current administration. I just feel like at this point in time, we need somebody like him in the White House.”

Dede Nay, a retired teacher, traveled to Fountain Hills from Pinetop to hear Trump.

“There’s a lot of bad things that are going on in the government – corruption. And I pray he makes it to the end, but if he doesn’t I think the one good thing that he has done is expose the corruption that’s not only rampant in the Democratic Party, but it’s also in the Republican Party,” she said. “We keep electing … Republicans in, and nothing’s been done. They have betrayed us.”

Obama to get more active in 2016 campaign

Sunday, March 20th, 2016

Look for President Obama to get more and more involved in the campaign to pick his successor.

While seeking to stay neutral in the Democratic race between Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders, Obama has begun speaking out against Republican front-runner Donald Trump and will amplify his remarks in the weeks and months ahead, officials said.

“The President has been clear that as we get closer to the general election, it will become even more important that the American people understand what is at stake,” said White House spokeswoman Jennifer Friedman. “Do we continue to build on the policies that reward hard-working American families, advance our economic and national security, and address challenges for future generations, or do we stop in our tracks, reverse our progress and move in the wrong direction?”

She added: “This is a choice that the President does not take lightly, and is something he will lay out for the American people with increased frequency in the weeks and months ahead.”

At some point, that will include an Obama endorsement of the Democratic candidate, though aides said that’s not happening just yet.

Officials disputed reports that Obama all but endorsed Clinton during a recent fundraiser in Austin, Texas, noting that Sanders is still running.

Obama did cast a vote in this week’s Illinois primary, but aides would not say who he voted for.

“What the President has said, both publicly and privately, is that he will have an important responsibility in the summer and fall, once the nomination process has concluded, in bringing the party together,” said White House press secretary Josh Earnest.

Reports The Washington Post:

“Obama and his top aides have been strategizing for weeks about how they can reprise his successful 2008 and 2012 approaches to help elect a Democrat to replace him. And out of concern that a Republican president in 2017 — either Trump or Sen. Ted Cruz (Tex.) — would weaken or reverse some of his landmark policies, Obama and his surrogates have started making the case that it is essential for the GOP to be defeated in November.

“As a result, Obama is poised to be the most active sitting president on the campaign trail in decades.”

Violence during Trump’s meetings

Saturday, March 12th, 2016

Statement: Donald Trump’s campaign on decision to cancel Friday rally in Chicago: ‘It would have been easier for Mr. Trump to have spoken, but he decided, in the interest of everyone’s safety, to postpone the event’ –

Sen. Bernie Sanders on Donald Trump rally incidents in Chicago: ‘Our supporters are responding to a candidate who has, in many ways encouraged violence’ –

Secret Service surround Donald Trump after person attempts to jump on stage in Dayton, Ohio

Hillary Clinton responds to Donald Trump, violence in Chicago: ‘The ugly, divisive rhetoric we are hearing from Donald Trump and the encouragement of violence and aggression is wrong, and it’s dangerous. If you play with matches, you’re going to start a fire you can’t control. That’s not leadership.

Hillary Clinton on violence at Donald Trump rally: ‘The divisive rhetoric we are seeing should be of grave concern to us all… Violence has no place in our politics, we should use our words and deeds to bring Americans together’

Gov. John Kasich says Donald Trump has created ‘toxic environment’

Marco Rubio says if Donald Trump is nominee, ‘the Republican Party’s going to be defined by’ violence

Michael Bloomberg Says He Won’t Run for President in 2016

Wednesday, March 9th, 2016

Michael Bloomberg, the billionaire former three-term mayor of New York, said he’s decided against entering the 2016 presidential race, removing one of the remaining uncertainties in what already has been an unusual and unpredictable election year.

Bloomberg, 74, who had said the 2016 presidential campaign has been marred by appeals to extremism and was an insult to voters, was expected to spend a sizable amount of his own fortune if he entered the race. Bloomberg is the founder and majority owner of Bloomberg News parent Bloomberg LP.

Bloomberg also said his candidacy risked dividing the vote and throwing the election into Congress. “As the race stands now, with Republicans in charge of both Houses, there is a good chance that my candidacy could lead to the election of Donald Trump or Senator Ted Cruz. That is not a risk I can take in good conscience,” Bloomberg wrote.

There have been several prominent independent or third-party presidential candidates during the past century, most recently Ralph Nader in 2000, Ross Perot in 1992 and 1996, and John Anderson in 1980. Perot won 19 percent of the popular vote nationwide in 1992, but carried no states and won no electoral votes. The last such candidate to secure any electoral votes was segregationist George Wallace in 1968.

At a town hall event in Detroit televised by Fox News, Sanders offered muted reaction to Bloomberg’s announcement.

“That’s his decision,” Sanders said. The Democrat said it’s a “bad idea for American democracy that the only people who feel they can run for president” are wealthy.

March 5th Election Results

Sunday, March 6th, 2016

Trump and Cruz were Saturday’s big winners, claiming two victories each in four Republican state contests. Trump won the Kentucky caucus and Louisiana primary while Cruz claimed caucus wins in Kansas and Maine.

Despite the support of many elected officials, Rubio’s lackluster performance Saturday raises serious questions about his viability in the race. He finished in third place in every state that voted Saturday except Maine, where The Associated Press projected him to finish behind Kasich.

Rubio said the upcoming schedule of primaries would be “better for us,” and renewed his vow to win his home state of Florida, claiming all 99 delegates there on March 15.

Saturday’s races saw high voter turnout in several states. Turnout in Republican presidential caucuses in Kansas exceeded the party’s most optimistic predictions.

Party leaders — including 2012 nominee Mitt Romney and 2008 nominee Sen. John McCain — are fearful a Trump victory would lead to a disastrous November election, with losses up and down the GOP ticket.

“Everyone’s trying to figure out how to stop Trump,” Trump marveled about himself at an afternoon rally in Orlando, Florida. At the rally, the billionaire businessman had supporters raise their hands and swear to vote for him.

On the Democratic side, there was another divided verdict from voters. Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders notched wins in the Nebraska and Kansas caucuses, while front-runner Hillary Clinton snagged a win in the Louisiana primary.

“No matter who wins this Democratic nomination, I have not the slightest doubt that on our worst day we will be infinitely better than the Republicans on their best day,” Clinton said.

She also said she was thrilled to add to her delegate count and expected to do well in Michigan’s primary on Tuesday. But before that, she and Sanders will go head-to-head Sunday in Maine’s Democratic caucus where 30 delegates are up for grabs. Republicans will battle it out in Puerto Rico’s GOP caucus for 23 delegates.

Despite Clinton’s commanding lead in the delegate count, Sanders vowed to keep fighting until the Democratic convention in Philadelphia this summer.

US election: Republican Ben Carson officially ends White House bid

Saturday, March 5th, 2016

Republican Ben Carson ends his campaign to become the next US President

Republican presidential candidate Ben Carson has officially ended his bid for the White House after failing to win any of the early states in the race for the November election.

“There are a lot of people who love me, they just won’t vote for me,” Dr Carson said in a speech at the Conservative Political Action Conference outside Washington.

Dr Carson had announced on Wednesday that he did not see a “political path forward” in his campaign for the party’s nomination.

He also failed to attend the Republican debate in Michigan the following day.

The retired neurosurgeon’s campaign soared last year but steadily lost steam amid questions over his personal narrative and lacklustre debate performances.

Now that Dr Carson has officially dropped out, that leaves Donald Trump and a trio of pursuers: Ted Cruz, Marco Rubio and Ohio Governor John Kasich.

Clinton and Trump near the promised land

Wednesday, March 2nd, 2016

Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump entered Super Tuesday and its dozen contests as their parties’ front-runners. Now that the dust has settled, has that changed?

Not at all.

The path to stop Trump? It’s a narrow one

Donald Trump waves as he steps on stage to speak at

The Republican establishment is not ready to embrace him. His top challengers, by all appearances, remain determined to stop him and are getting increasingly personal and aggressive in their tactics.

There’s the fact that instead of having just one determined rival, he still has at least two in Marco Rubio and Ted Cruz, to say nothing of John Kasich and Ben Carson, who continue to pick up votes, making it possible for the New York billionaire to win contests decisively with his existing base of support. And those Trump supporters, if we’ve learned anything in this campaign, aren’t going anywhere, no matter what.

Hillary Clinton addresses supporters at her Super Tuesday

Clinton entered the 2016 presidential race as a prohibitive front-runner to become the Democratic nominee. Then, unexpectedly, Bernie Sanders emerged as not only as viable alternative but a threat to win many of the early states — a belief he validated by losing Iowa by the narrowest of margins, then taking New Hampshire in a landslide. But even before the first votes were cast, it was long believed, no matter what, that the March 1 slate of contests, mostly in the South with large African-American electorates, would shore up Clinton’s candidacy and stem whatever momentum Sanders may have acquired.

The math for Sanders has always been unkind. Super Tuesday made it worse.

Is there anything Sanders can do?

Bernie Sanders arrives at a primary night rally in

he’d need to start winning big to either overcome that lead or somehow convince superdelegates to switch their allegiances — and both scenarios seem pretty unlikely.

Marco Rubio finally gets a win in Texas !

Marco Rubio waves to supporters at a campaign rally

Jeb Bush never really had a chance.

Monday, February 22nd, 2016

Despite all his money, despite his family name, despite his endorsements, Bush’s presidential bid ran afoul of the anti-establishment “outsider” politics that have dominated the 2016 campaign and produced the phenomenon of Donald Trump.

He announced late Saturday he would suspend his campaign.

http://www.gannett-cdn.com/-mm-/426730ad6853e2fb4422e95bdf84248c2cf13e81/c=659-0-6000-4016&r=x404&c=534x401/local/-/media/2016/02/19/USATODAY/USATODAY/635914965899174271-GTY-511294990.jpg

who’s still in for the republicans ?? link here

Carson

Cruz

Kasich

Rubio

Trump