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Posts Tagged ‘women’s rights’

The irish referendum on abortion

Thursday, May 31st, 2018

When was the abortion referendum in Ireland?

The polls officially opened on May 25, with many Irish citizens around the world flying home to cast their votes.

Around 2,000 residents on islands off Counties Donegal, Mayo and Galway went to the polls on May 24, a day ahead of the rest of the country.

The Irish electorate voted by 1,429,981 votes to 723,632 in favour of abolishing the controversial eighth amendment to the constitution.

The Government now intends to allow terminations within the first 12 weeks in the event.

Counting began on the morning of Saturday May 26.

The result was a two-thirds majority: 66.4 per cent yes to 33 per cent no.

What happens now?

Victory for the yes side means that the only part of the United Kingdom and Ireland where abortion remains banned in almost all circumstances is Northern Ireland.

Taoiseach Leo Varadkar, a campaigner for the yes vote, said that he hopes to pass the proposed legislation within six months.

He said: “The fact that the result is so clear that is a more than 2-1 in favour, will make it much easier to get the legislation through the Dail.”

The proposed legislation that will be introduced by the Government will allow abortions within the first 12 weeks of pregnancy.

‘The Silence Breakers’ Named Time’s Person of the Year for 2017

Friday, December 8th, 2017

First it was a story. Then a moment. Now, two months after women began to come forward in droves to accuse powerful men of sexual harassment and assault, it is a movement.

Time magazine has named “the silence breakers” its person of the year for 2017, referring to those women, and the global conversation they have started.

The magazine’s editor in chief, Edward Felsenthal, said in an interview on the “Today” show on Wednesday that the #MeToo movement represented the “fastest-moving social change we’ve seen in decades, and it began with individual acts of courage by women and some men too.”

Investigations published in October by The New York Times and The New Yorker, both of them detailing multiple allegations of sexual harassment and assault against the movie producer Harvey Weinstein, sparked the sudden rush of women coming forward.

In a joint interview after the choice was announced, Tarana Burke, who created the Me Too mantra years ago, and the actress Alyssa Milano, who helped promote it more recently, focused on what was still left to do.

“I’ve been saying from the beginning that it’s not just a moment, it’s a movement,” Ms. Burke said. “I think now the work really begins. The hashtag is a declaration. But now we’re poised to really stand up and do the work.”

Ms. Milano agreed, laying out her aspirations for the movement.

“I want companies to take on a code of conduct, I want companies to hire more women, I want to teach our children better,” she said. “These are all things that we have to set in motion, and as women we have to support each other and stand together and say that’s it, we’re done, no more.”

It is a testament to the size of the movement that the set of “Today” itself, where the announcement was made, had recently been the site of such a reckoning. Matt Lauer, one of NBC’s most well-known personalities for decades, was fired only last week after an allegation of sexual harassment from a subordinate. Other complaints soon followed.

And of course, Time’s 2017 runner-up for person of the year, Donald J. Trump, was accused during his presidential campaign by more than 10 women of sexual misconduct, from unwanted touching to sexual assault.

Tarana Burke, the woman who realized the power of the simple words “Me Too,” marched with others in Los Angeles in November. Credit Lucy Nicholson/Reuters

Those accusations did not stop Mr. Trump from being named person of the year in 2016. And Mr. Trump inadvertently promoted this year’s announcement, tweeting that he had been told he would “probably” be chosen again and claiming to have turned down the honor. Time quickly released a statement saying that the president was incorrect.

Time has been using the title for more than nine decades to drum up interest in one of its tentpole issues. The magazine chose its first group, as opposed to a single “man of the year” (and back then it was a man), in 1950, when it selected “the American Fighting-man.” The title was changed to the neutral “person of the year” in 1999.

Other groups have included “Americans under 25” in 1966, “The Whistleblowers” in 2002 and, memorably, “You” in 2006.

In 1975, the magazine chose “American women,” profiling a dozen who it said “symbolized the new consciousness of women generally.” It would be a decade before Time selected another woman.

La saison des femmes

Sunday, April 24th, 2016

Un film indien

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How Tennis’s Pay Gap Compares to Other Sports

Saturday, April 2nd, 2016

This year’s U.S. Open tennis tournament will pay out a record $38.3 million in prize money, with $3 million going to the winner of the men’s and women’s singles titles, not including potential bonus money.

See an interactive graphic of the pay gap between No. 1 and No. 32 in tennis and other sports.

U.S. Women’s Soccer Team Stars Allege Pay Discrimination

Saturday, April 2nd, 2016

Complaint says players earn a fraction of their male counterparts despite superior achievements

Five of the biggest stars on the world champion U.S. women’s national soccer team accused the U.S. Soccer Federation of pay discrimination, despite the women’s team’s superior on-field achievements and higher anticipated revenue.

The women’s national team is a three-time World Cup winner and defending Olympic champion.

“The numbers speak for themselves,” said Ms. Solo. “We are the best in the world, have three World Cup championships, four Olympic championships, and the [men’s national team] get paid more to just show up than we get paid to win major championships.”

“We continue to be told we should be grateful just to have the opportunity to play professional soccer, to get paid for doing it,” said Ms. Solo, a goalkeeper and two-time Olympic goal medalist who has been playing for the team since 2000, in the “Today” interview on Thursday.

“We believe now the time is right because we believe it’s our responsibility for women’s sports and specifically for women’s soccer to do whatever it takes to push for equal pay and equal rights. And to be treated with respect,” she added.

Suffragette

Tuesday, December 8th, 2015

Voici le film dont je vous ai parlé en classe

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The suffragettes

Sunday, April 19th, 2015

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