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Posts Tagged ‘young people’

A quarter of 20-somethings now live at home

Thursday, January 23rd, 2014

Thanks to the economic crisis more young people live at home

Yahoo Finance UK

By | Yahoo Finance UK – Tue, Jan 21, 2014 17:42 GMT

  • More yong people are living at home

    Yahoo Finance UK/Rex Features – More yong people are living at home

  • Yahoo Finance UK – Thu, Jan 16, 2014 11:35 GMT

The economic crisis has had a significant and lasting effect on the lives of young people, as more than one in four now live with their parents, according to official data.   The number of 20-34 year-olds in their family home has jumped by 669,000 since 1996, the Office for National Statistics has found.
This is despite the number of people in this section of the population remaining largely the same. There are now 3.3 million living with their parents, up from 2.7 million in 1996.
The highest increase has been among 20-24 year-olds – especially in the last five years. In 2008, 42% of 20 to 24-year-olds lived with their parents, but by last year the percentage had increased to 49%.
It’s thought that the economic crisis is a large underlying factor, as the number of unemployed people aged 18-24 has increased from 13% to 19% during the same five years. 

Young adults aged 20-34 living with parents in the UK, 1996-2013 (ONS)
Economic activity of those aged 20-34, UK, 2013 (ONS)

Young men are far more likely to live with their parents, with one in three staying put, compared with one in five women.
However, this is not because young women have greater economic success, but because they are more likely to be in a relationship and living with their older partner or because they are a lone parent.
In fact, 600,000 more women aged 20-34 were found to be living as part of a couple than men, and on average women are more likely to have a relationship with a man older than themselves, according to the ONS.
There were nearly as many women who were lone parents in their own household. And it was also found that women are more likely to be in higher education, in the process leaving their parent’s home.

Men and women aged 20-34 living with parents, UK, 2013 (ONS)
Young adults aged 20-34 living with parents by region, 2011-2013 (ONS)

In spite of the huge cost of either buying or renting in London, it has the lowest percentage of young adults living with their parents at 22%. Mainly because the capital has a large influx of young people moving from other areas for work or study, said the ONS.
On the other hand, the region with the highest number of young people living with their parents was found to be Northern Ireland.
This is because it’s easier to commute to work or university from the family home. And because cohabitation among couples is much lower – even though the average age for a first marriage in Northern Ireland is lower than in England and Wales.
This suggests a more traditional picture of family life, where the time between leaving home to marry or cohabit is shorter than elsewhere, said the ONS.

+ VIDEO to watch here at the end of the original article

Days of children reading books ‘are numbered’

Wednesday, September 23rd, 2009

The days of children reading traditional books are numbered, claims the man spearheading a campaign to improve literacy in schools.

 

Publishers must adapt titles to the demands of modern young readers who spend more time on the internet if they are to succeed in persuading the next generation to read, says Jonathan Douglas, the director of the National Literacy Trust.

He made his remarks as researchers prepared to tell a conference starting today that children’s reading habits slump dramatically after they start at secondary school. The typical eight-year-old reads nearly 16 books a year but, by the time they reach 15 or 16, this has dwindled to just over three books per year. The big drop-off starts after the first year of secondary school, when the number of books read falls from nearly 12 a year to just six.

The study, based on interviews with nearly 30,000 pupils aged seven to 16, also shows a growing trend towards reading comics, magazines, newspapers and online articles, and playing computer games, after the first year at secondary school.

“Reading books does not maintain the strength of its hold on young people as an activity,” Mr Douglas said. “It begins to diminish from the age of 11. Publishers and the book trade must reinvent the book. They have to produce more graphic novels. Children are much more visually conscious than they were before – and the book trade must reflect this.

“Reading is not a static activity. It has always changed from one generation to another, depending on where literacy skills sat within society and what texts were available and why.”

A research paper entitled What Kids Are Reading, by Professor Keith Topping of Dundee University, will be presented to a national conference on literacy and numeracy in Stansted today. It also reveals marked differences in the books that girls and boys choose to read.

Among pre-teen girls, Jacqueline Wilson is overwhelmingly their favourite author. Her books explore growing up and teenage relationships and emotional development. Boys prefer adventure stories such as J K Rowling’s Harry Potter novels and children’s books by Roald Dahl.

Many respondents did not believe they were engaging in reading if they were scanning items online. Mr Douglas said: “Twenty-nine per cent did not see themselves as readers but they were spending a vast amount of time reading online.

“They thought reading only related to books. This shows we will have to develop new strategies for promoting reading to children in future.”

One way would to do this would be to ensure that more classic books and novels were made available online with illustrations, he added.

taken from : http://www.independent.co.uk/news/education/education-news/days-of-children-reading-books-are-numbered-955497.html

What about you ? Do you still read novels ?