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The Phillies Win Game One of the 2009 World Series
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What will the future of newspapers be?

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Here are a few links to famous American, British and Canadian newspapers and magazines as well as related articles on Wikipedia.

Don’t forget to click on the ‘video’ section of the different newspapers to listen to some English!

The USA: The Flag
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DAILY NEWSPAPERS:

img_3902
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The Washington Post + description

Renzo Piano: The New York Times Building
Creative Commons License photo credit: Dom Dada

The New York Times + description

foreclosures are front page news
Creative Commons License photo credit: TheTruthAbout…

The Los Angeles Times + description

usa today
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USA Today + description

WEEKLY MAGAZINES:

TIME Magazine; Person of the Year, Greg's Art and My Photo Online
Creative Commons License photo credit: Tony the Misfit

Timedescription

The Culture of Recession
Creative Commons License photo credit: thms.nl

Newsweek + description

BRITAIN: Union Jack
Creative Commons License photo credit: Jérôme Briot

DAILY NEWSPAPERS:

The Times...
Creative Commons License photo credit: Peter Morris – Photography

The Times + description

Guardian: front pages work on the web, right?
Creative Commons License photo credit: Coneee

The Guardian + description

London day 2
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The Independent + description

A WEEKLY NEWSPAPER:

Although it looks like a newsmagazine, The Economist calls itself a ‘newspaper’.

The Road Ahead
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The Economist + description

TABLOIDS:

tabloid (a definition taken from dictionary.com)

http://cdn.worldcupblog.org/www.worldcupblog.org/files/2008/03/tabloids.jpg

–noun

1. a newspaper whose pages, usually five columns wide, are about one-half the size of a standard-sized newspaper page.
2. a newspaper this size concentrating on sensational and lurid news, usually heavily illustrated.
3. a short form or version; condensation; synopsis; summary.

–adjective

4. compressed or condensed in or as if in a tabloid: a tabloid article; a tabloid account of the adventure.
5. luridly or vulgarly sensational.

IMG_5183


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The Sun + description

On the other hand, the Mirror
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The Daily Mirror + description


CANADA:canada flag
Creative Commons License photo credit: Alistair Howard

DAILY NEWSPAPERS:

G&M, revamped.
Creative Commons License photo credit: gak

The Globe and Mail + description

Government Motors
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The Toronto Star + description




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