Hello

Watch the videos and do the following activities

Image de prévisualisation YouTube

What type of video is it? Where does the scene take place? When could it be? What is the product advertised?

Then describe the action with as many detaisl as possible  in your own words. You can use an online dictionary http://wordreference.com/

Then work on the lyrics of the  song.

Image de prévisualisation YouTube

after describe what happens in between the concert scenes.

Then work form the worksheet I gave you. Listen to the song and fill in the blanks.

Watch the last video and work on the worksheet

last_christmas_remix

Enjoy

Thierry

 

 

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Here is a very interesting video recounting Michaël Jackson’s life.

Enjoy watching it. We will work on it in class.


Here is the second video we are going to work on, Thriller.


Enjoy watching both videos.

Thierry

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Hi there

Do you want to know a little bit more about colloquial and informal English in songs?

Here is a good example in a very cool video clip: Laurent Wolf and No stress!


here are the lyrics of the song:
I don’t wanna work today
Maybe I just wanna stay
Just take it easy cause there’s no stress.
I know it’s not an awful crime,
Something special in my mind,
Nothing‘s gonna cause me distress.
I text my baby on her phone,
Try to get her sexy body home
That’s the way I wanna spend my day.
Got to find an alibi
Cause I don’t wanna waste my time
I don’t wanna feel distress.

It’s not that I’m lazy
I think I’m just crazy
It’s not that I’m lazy
I think I’m just crazy
It’s not that I’m lazy
Think I’m just crazy
It’s not that I’m lazy
I’m just crazy

No stress

I think I’m just crazy
No need to fight against the feelings
Because the life is not depressing
No need to fight against the feelings
Because the life is not depressing

[instrumental]

No stress

Oohoo

[instrumental]

I don’t wanna work today
I don’t wanna work today
I don’t wanna work today
Maybe I just wanna stay
Just take it easy cause there is no stress.
I know it’s not an awful crime
Something special in my mind
Nothing’s gonna cause me disstress.
I text my baby on her phone
Try to get her Sexy body home
That’s the way I wanna spend my day
Got to find an alibi
Cause I don’t wanna waste my time
I don’t wanna feel disjstress.

It’s not that I’m lazy
I think I’m just crazy
It’s not that I’m lazy
I think I’m just crazy
It’s not that I’m lazy
Think I’m just crazy
It’s not that I’m lazy
I’m just crazy

No stress
I think I’m just crazy
Not depressing

No need to fight against the feelings
Because the life is not depressing
No need to fight against the feelings
Because the life is not depressing

I don’t wanna work today
Oohoo
I don’t wanna work today
No stress
I don’t wanna work today
Oohoo
I don’t wanna work today

Here, what are « wanna » and « gonna »?


Wanna is used in written English to represent the words `want to’ when they are pronounced informally/ in a relaxed way.


I wanna be rich. Do you wanna be rich ? (I want to be rich. Do you want to be rich?)

Gonna is used in written English to represent the words ` going to’ when they are pronounced informally/ in a    relaxed way.

He’s gonna buy a car. (He is going to buy a car)

There are some other examples of words pronounced in a relaxed way:

  • could have: [?k???], « coulda »
  • must have: [?m?st?], « musta »
  • should have: [?????], « shoulda »
  • would have: [?w???], « woulda »
  • it would / it would have: [????], « itta »
  • a lot of: [??l???], « a lotta »
  • kind of: [?ka???], « kinda »
  • out of: [?a???], « outta »
  • sort of: [?s????], « sorta »
  • going to: [?g?n?], « gonna »
  • got to: [?g???], « gotta »
  • have to: [?hæft?], « hafta »
  • want to: [?w?n?], « wanna »

You

« You » tends to elide to [j?]; softening of the preceding consonant also may occur: (/t/ + /j?/ = [t??], and /d/ + /j?/ = [d??])

  • did you: [?d?d??], « didja »
  • don’t you: [?do?nt??], « doncha »
  • got you: [?g?t??], « gotcha »
  • get you / get your: [?g?t??], « getcha »
  • would you: [?w?d??], « wouldja »

Other

  • give me: [?g?mi], « gimme »
  • is he: [??zi], « izee »
  • is it: [z?t], « zit »
  • let me: [?l?mi], « lemme »
  • don’t know: [d??no?], « dunno »
  • probably: [?p??li], « prolly »
  • what is that: [?w??sæt], « wussat »
  • what is up: [w??s?p], « wassup »
  • what is up: [s?p], « sup »
  • what do you / what are you: [?w?t??], « whatcha »
  • what do you / what are you: [?w???j?], « whaddaya »
  • you all: [j?l], « y’all »
Source (wikipedia)

There is also slang which consists of words, expressions, and meanings that are informal and are used by people who know each other very well or who have the same interests.

Be careful slang tends to be vulgar and offensive!

Example:

In formal English a bird is this:

In slang, a  BIRD: can be:

1. A female. Use can be taken as offensive. E.g. »Did you see that bird at the back of the bus! »
2. A girlfiend, when used in conjunction with a possessive pronoun, such as my bird.
3. Time spent in prison. E.g. »I did 20 years bird before I learnt how to control my temper and keep out of trouble. »

(source: http://www.peevish.co.uk/slang/)

Here are some interesting sites on slang and dialects

British slang and language related sites:
  • London Slang – current usage, including rhyming slang. With an introduction, slang survey, bibliography and films, it’s well worth a butchers.
  • Completely Lanky – a wonderful insight into the Lancashire dialect. Based on Dave Dutton’s reyt funny book of the same name.
  • United Kingdom English for the American Novice – a listing of British words and phrases, from an American’s perspective, including some slang, with definitions in American. (Last updated Jan 1996)
  • Everyday English and Slang in Ireland – a starting point for those interested in the rich language of the Irish, and although not strictly British, Anglo-Irish slang is very much a common part of UK English.
  • IRISH SLANG AND DIALECT
  • A Dublin Dictionary – ‘add to the world’s understanding of Dublinese’.
  • The Lovely Language of Northern Ireland – a collection of slang and colloquial expressions from Northern Ireland.
  • Cockney Rhyming Slang – an interesting selection of the often enigmatic vernacular of London’s East End.
  • Glesga Glossary – slang from Glasgow, including some favourite glesga phrases.
  • The Geordie Dictionary – a moderate collection of dialect and slang from Tyneside, in the North East of England.
  • Durham & Tyneside Dialect Group – words, literature, publications and a newsletter.
  • TeesSpeak an Urban Dialect – wonderful dictionary of the dialect of Teeside, Middlesbrough, plus associated articles and links.
  • The Updated GonMad Cumbrian Dictionary – currently small but is sure to grow rapidly with the many rich dialectisms of Cumbria
  • The Lakeland Dialect Society – A glossary with accompanying news, publications and more.
  • Merseytalk – the rich heritage of speech coined and used in Liverpool and the wider area of Merseyside.
  • Wenglish – the dialect of the valleys and townships of South Wales. John Edward’s dictionary site of the Welsh/English dialectical oddity.
  • Ye Olde English Sayings – offers a revealing insight into the origins of some well-known British phrases, with a selection of alternative suggestions submitted by visitors.
  • The Law of the Playground – an unusual collection of the language of children, from the playground, including some slang.
  • Estuary English – written articles and links related to English spoken around London. Authored by the University College London.
  • Whoohoo – takes a light-hearted approach to the English language and allows the translation of phrases and emails into your choice of the British dialects, including amongst others Cockney, Scouse, Geordie, Scottish and Brummie.
  • The Routes of English – provides a selection of radio articles on dialect, the future of English and other relevant topics. Presenting audio clips from the BBC Radio 4 series on the English language.
  • The Yorkshire Dialect Society – publicity and website links.
  • Yorkshire Dialect Dictionary – good collection of dialect local to Yorkshire.
  • North Yorkshire Glossary – a BBC page & dictionary, with additional submissions from readers.
  • Language of the Potteries – a humorous look at the North Staffordshire tongue, illustrated with a few complimentary cartoons.
  • Birmingham Slang – more Midlands/Black Country dialect and slang.
  • A Bristolian Dictionary – a section of the humorous ‘That Be Bristle’ news website.
  • F.O.N.D. – Friends of Norfolk Dialect – dedicated to conserving, recording and promoting the linguistic and cultural heritage of the Norfolk dialect.
  • Mawdesley Dialect – a glossary of Lancashire words as spoken in Mawdesley.

(Taken from http://www.peevish.co.uk/slang/links.htm#british)

Have fun!

Thierry
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Here is a really nice song by Dido called Mary’s in India.

I will post some others very soon by other artists so that you can work on them. The worksheet will be available soon.

If you want to stop the music, press the pause button  «  » below.

Have fun and enjoy it.
Thierry

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