Youth club in Kyoto-The Kasuga Gakudo Club

13 04 2013

Yoann : we met japonese children in a youth club which is in a former school building. We spent some time in the playground with them, and I met Takaya ; he’s my friend now.

Titouan : we found a bumblebee, that we held in our hand. We learned a japonese ball game. Next day, we went back to the club and we spent the afternoon and had much fun with the children. Since it rained, we stayed inside.

Yoann : we played in a classroom together.
I drew a kanji on a board. It is used for japanese writing. A girl recognized it immediately, she said : « ie » which means « house ». A lady staying in our guesthouse but living in Taïwan showed it to me and said that it was the same sign in chinese.
We played at the «Pictionnary ».
We tried to play « Go».
We also made very nice origamis. Takaya showed me a game which is similar to our « feuille pierre sciseaux » (paper, stone, cisors). After a snack, Takaya left for his swimming lesson.

Titouan : I played with japanese children at building a castle with enormous cubes, and then we had fun at passing underneath.

Traduction en français

School year in Japan has started on april 8th. The children have a bit more than a month free, between july and august. Spring holidays for Sakura last at least 2 weeks. The dates of our stay did not give us much time to meet students. The teachers were too busy the first week to receive us. But we kept going on, and decided to meet children in a youth club.

Despite our very poor japanese, the staff of the « Kasuga Gakudo Club » understood well our project of sharing time with the children, and welcomed us immediately with great simplicity. Eko was very kind and helpful. Thanks to her « smartphone » and the translation function, we could communicate easily. Our boys spent a lovely afternoon, they shared games with the children of the club : writing on the board, musical chairs, origamis, Pictionnary.

Since we have left Marseilles, Yoann and Titouan have been playing the Go » game, which is a strategy game originated in China 2500 years ago. Go game was spread very early in Japan, then all over Asia. But during our trip in Japan, we can see that it is not so well known by japanese children.

Yoann and Titouan keep in touch with Takaya, 7 years. Takaya’s mother was very happy to exchange adresses with us.

Happy House School, a kenyan primary school

9 02 2013

The Happy House School is a kenyan primary school located in the southern districts of Nairobi. There are about 70 children dispatched in 8 classrooms, plus a “kinder garden”.

The children spend 8 years in the primary school, from 6 to 13. Then they go to high chool. School is from monday to friday. The year starts in january after the longest holidays in december. We have been warmly welcomed by the director, also teacher, who kindly introduced us to 2 classrooms : 1st year and 3rd year.

The children and their teacher welcomed us, all standing, by a “good morning”. Yoann and Titouan, one after the other, in the respective 1st year and 3rd year classrooms, introduced themselves despite their shyness regarding their english level. Then they pointed out Marseille and France on a worlmap, and the distance betwween the 2 countries. We talked about Marseille and showed pictures to the kenyan children.

traduction en français

We explained that our wish, during the worldtour, was to go and meet children in their school, in order to establish a correspondance between them and schools in Marseille. They were very curious and willing to have penfriends in a french school. We also talked about School in France and showed a short video of Yoann’s classroom. And we could then played at looking for the differences and similarities.

Differences :

  • 6 children in each classroom
  • 5 teachers in each classroom including the referent teacher, and 7 subjects : 5 of them given in english (mathematics, sciences, social studies, …), swahili, and french once a week !
  • The children wear a uniform

Swahili is the language of Kenya and English is the official language. By the age of 8, the kenyan children are bilingual and speak fluently english, that they start learning by 3 ! And most of them are even trilingual because they have been brought up in their mother tongue.

Similarities :

Yoann : there are boards on each side of the class. They have a book of mathematics and I saw substractions on it.
We showed them the boys’ books of french and mathematics and we noticed that the programs are the same as in France, in both classrooms.
They have a library corner and a dining hall. They have a break time of 20 minutes in the morning and afternoon. Yoann and Titouan shared games with the kenyans children and

Yoann was even given a piece of paper with numbers in swahili. They all like football, swimming, races, basket …

Yoann : “Sawa” in swahili means “ça va !” in french (everything’s fine !). It sounds the same !

Lettre à nos correspondants des écoles du Monde (*english translation inside)

18 12 2012

Bonjour les correspondants,

Nous sommes la classe des CP et des CE1.

Nous sommes 24 enfants. Swanne est notre maîtresse et il y aussi 2 AVS qui s’appellent Christiane et Elisia.

Notre école s’appelle Bonneveine2. Elle est au 52 Boulevard du Sablier, 13008, Marseille, FRANCE. Elle a 5 classes.

Nous sommes dans une école Freinet.

Dans notre classe, nous avons des délégués, nous faisons de la cuisine, nous faisons l’entretien tous les matins, nous faisons le conseil des enfants, nous faisons du travail individuel avec un contrat. Nous faisons aussi des enquêtes et nous avons un coin observation.

Chaque enfant de notre classe a un métier. Les CE1 vont à la piscine le jeudi pendant que les CP font de l’athlétisme avec une autre maîtresse.

Au revoir.

La classe.

* English translation of our letter

Liste des visites thématiques sur Marseille

14 06 2012

Liste des visites thématiques

Je propose mes services de guide et guide interprète aux établissements scolaires (et leurs homologues étrangers), du cycle III aux classes de seconde, dans le cadre de projets culturels : j’ai développé un concept de découvertes conjuguant visites commentées participatives et jeux de piste thématiques pour explorer le patrimoine de Marseille (sites, monuments et collections de musées dans le cadre de l’apprentissage de l’histoire et de l’histoire des arts-visuels).

Découverte de Marseille pour une classe de 5ième d’un collège anglais (élèves bilingues français/anglais)

3 05 2011

Programme sur mesure pour mieux appréhender les origines de la cité phocéenne (découverte d’environ 4H)

Départ du collège en autobus en direction du Vieux-Port.

Sur le parcours,  les élèves doivent situer sur un plan de la ville 5 monuments ou sculptures rencontrés le long de la corniche (en collant sur le plan la gommette de couleur correspondant à chaque monument) ; ces 5 sculptures racontent chacune un événement de l’histoire de la ville.

Depuis l’abbaye Saint-Victor, la vue panoramique sur le Vieux-Port  permet d’introduire la fondation de la cité phocéenne et d’expliquer l’histoire de l’urbanisation de Marseille sur les deux rives. L’évocation de l’abbaye est aussi l’opportunité de faire le lien avec la plus ancienne boulangerie de Marseille et d’y faire une incursion pour déguster les célèbres navettes !

La traversée du Vieux-Port en ferry-boat reste incontournable pour des élèves étrangers et offre une belle opportunité d’évoquer le célèbre pont transbordeur du début du 20e siècle.

Une balade urbaine dans le quartier du Panier attend les collégiens sur l’autre rive : sous la forme d’un jeu de piste par équipes de 3, ils partent à la découverte du berceau de Marseille. Observer, chercher, réfléchir ensemble, lire, écrire : autant de sollicitations qui permettent de mémoriser d’une façon ludique les connaissances acquises lors du jeu de piste.

A l’issue de la découverte, les collégiens étrangers sont incollables sur l’histoire de notre belle cité phocéenne : Massalia, Protis et Gyptis, Pytheas, Massilia, les Accoules, Les Majors, La Charité… autant de noms qui n’ont plus de secrets pour ces élèves !