Tesla’s poetry at the 6th International Poetry Festival in Paris

 

At the 20 arrondissement City Hall in Paris, UNESCO Clubs French Federation was represented by two persons : Claude Vielix, FFCU Vice-president and Aleksandar Protic FFCU Federal Counselor for the 6th International Poetry Festival in Paris. Claude Vielix talked about FFCU engagement and role in contemporary society, as well as in cultural activities. Aleksandar Protic informed the audience about the Tesla Memory Project and about Tesla’s scientific poetry. Both FFCU representatives met several poets came from all over the world to celebrate this Festival in Paris. Morii Kae read her poetry dedicated to peace and development in Fukushima. She offred to a FFCU a peace necklace, symbol from japaneese tradition. Aleksandar Protic in the name of UNESCO Club Sorbonne together with Morii Kae and Lana Rebecca March gathered to promote peace through poetry.

Tesla’s scientific poetry

 

 

Tesla wrote, in the late 1920s, a poem  Fragments of Olympian Gossip to his friend George Sylvester Viereck, (a well-known German poet and mystic) parodying some of what were called « the scientific establishment of the day ».

 

 

Fragments of Olympian Gossip 

While listening on my cosmic phone
I caught words from the Olympus blown.
A newcomer was shown around;
That much I could guess, aided by sound.
« There’s Archimedes with his lever
Still busy on problems as ever.
Says: matter and force are transmutable
And wrong the laws you thought immutable. »
« Below, on Earth, they work at full blast
And news are coming in thick and fast.
The latest tells of a cosmic gun.
To be pelted is very poor fun.
We are wary with so much at stake,
Those beggars are a pest—no mistake. »
« Too bad, Sir Isaac, they dimmed your renown
And turned your great science upside down.
Now a long haired crank, Einstein by name,
Puts on your high teaching all the blame.
Says: matter and force are transmutable
And wrong the laws you thought immutable. »
« I am much too ignorant, my son,
For grasping schemes so finely spun.
My followers are of stronger mind
And I am content to stay behind,
Perhaps I failed, but I did my best,
These masters of mine may do the rest.
Come, Kelvin, I have finished my cup.
When is your friend Tesla coming up. »
« Oh, quoth Kelvin, he is always late,
It would be useless to remonstrate. »
Then silence—shuffle of soft slippered feet—
I knock and—the bedlam of the street.

The oldest Balkan newspaper Politika about TESLA MEMORY PROJECT

The oldest Balkan newspaper Politika about TESLA MEMORY PROJECT presented in UNESCO Headquarters on 05/10/2012

The  objective of the TESLA Memory Project, initiated by Aleksandar Protic, president of UNESCO Club at Sorbonne University and the director of Intercultural Forum, is to increase awareness of UNESCO’s Memory of the World Register, global importance of science and life and work of Nikola Tesla.

Nikola Tesla, one of the world’s greatest scientists, is often considered as “The Man who invented the 20th century, now shaping the 21st century”. His impact on the modern world is enormous, products of his genius can be found in everyday life. Nikola Tesla exemplifies a unifying force and inspiration for all nations in the name of peace and science. He was an authentic visionary far ahead of his contemporaries in the field of scientific development. This is why UNESCO’s Memory of the World Register consideres Tesla’s inventions archives as a heritage of mankind.

Politika link to this article :

www.politika.rs/rubrike/kultura-i-zabava/Predavanje-o-Tesli-u-sedistu-UNESKO-u-Parizu.lt.htmla

TESLA Project and Memory of the World Register : lecture at UNESCO by Aleksandar Protic

Aleksandar Protic, president of UNESCO Club at Sorbonne University, and Federal Counselor  at the French Federation of UNESCO Clubs, presented  TESLA MEMORY PROJECT at UNESCO Headquarters teaching about The Memory of the World Register. French Federation of UNESCO Clubs organized on October 5th 2012 a one-day specialized program « LEARN MORE ABOUT UNESCO » in UNESCO Headquarters .

Lectures were provided by FFCU-FEACU : Aleksandar Protic (FFCU) Danièle Seigneuric (FFCU) and Lionel Vinour (FEACU) ; and UNESCO officers : Ana Dumitrescu (Culture), Cecilia Golden (MOST), Christine Morel Vasquez (DOC), Sylvie Cochet (DOCEdu).

The  objective of the TESLA Memory Project, initiated by Aleksandar Protic, president of UNESCO Club at Sorbonne University and the director of Intercultural Forum, is to increase awareness of UNESCO’s Memory of the World Register, global importance of science and life and work of Nikola Tesla.

Nikola Tesla, one of the world’s greatest scientists, is often considered as “The Man who invented the 20th century, now shaping the 21st century”. His impact on the modern world is enormous, products of his genius can be found in everyday life. Nikola Tesla exemplifies a unifying force and inspiration for all nations in the name of peace and science. He was an authentic visionary far ahead of his contemporaries in the field of scientific development. This is why UNESCO’s Memory of the World Register consideres Tesla’s inventions archives as a heritage of mankind.

Projet TESLA à l’ UNESCO pour célébrer la Journée mondiale de l’Enseignant

 

FORMATION  « MIEUX CONNAITRE l’UNESCO »

réalisée par la

FEDERATION FRANCAISE DES CLUBS UNESCO

VENDREDI 5 OCTOBRE, SIEGE DE L’UNESCO

 

 

 

PROGRAMME

 

 

Matin :  UNESCO  1 rue Miollis 75015 Paris

Accueil à partir de 9h

9h30 à 10h30 : Ouverture et présentation générale de l’UNESCO : historique, structure, rôle normatif par Danièle Seigneuric (FFCU) et Lionel Vinour (FEACU)

10h30 à 11h15 : Secteur Culture avec Anna Dumitrescu (UNESCO CLT)

11h15 à 12h : Programme MOST avec Cecilia Golden

12h-13h15 : Projet TESLA – Mémoire du Monde avec Aleksandar Protic (FFCU)

***

Après – midi : UNESCO  7 place de Fontenoy 75015 Paris

13h15 à 14h30 : repas

15h à 15h30 : visite guidée

15h30 à 16h : Centre de documentation avec Christine Morel Vasquez (UNESCO)

16h à 17h : Présentation des ressources pédagogiques au Centre de documentation Education avec Sylvie Cochet (UNESCO)

17h à 17h30 : Bilan et suggestions

 

UNESCO Club Sorbonne celebrated World Teachers’ Day 2012

 

UNESCO Club Sorbonne celebrated World Teachers’ Day 2012 at UNESCO Headquarters on 3/10/2012

UNESCO is celebrating World Teachers’ Day along with its partners every year.

 

 

« On this day, we call for teachers to receive supportive environments, adequate quality training as well as ‘safeguards’ for teachers’ rights and responsibilities…

We expect a lot from teachers – they, in turn, are right to expect as much from us. This World Teachers’ Day is an opportunity for all to take a stand. »

Irina Bokova, UNESCO Director-General

 

President Obama about Nikola Tesla as inventor who helped make America what it is

 

Obama’s Immigration Speech at the American University School of International Service, Washington D.C. on July 1, 2010.

President Barack Obama gave his first speech devoted to laying out his case for an overhaul of immigration laws since he became president.

Here is the official transcript released by the White House:

July 1, 2010
REMARKS BY THE PRESIDENT
ON COMPREHENSIVE IMMIGRATION REFORM
American University School of International Service
Washington, D.C.
11:12 A.M. EDT

THE PRESIDENT:

« Thank you very much. Thank you. Thank you. (Applause.) Everyone please have a seat. Thank you very much. Let me thank Pastor Hybels from near my hometown in Chicago, who took time off his vacation to be here today. We are blessed to have him.

I want to thank President Neil Kerwin and our hosts here at American University; acknowledge my outstanding Secretary of Labor, Hilda Solis, and members of my administration; all the members of Congress — Hilda deserves applause. (Applause.) To all the members of Congress, the elected officials, faith and law enforcement, labor, business leaders and immigration advocates who are here today — thank you for your presence.

I want to thank American University for welcoming me to the campus once again. Some may recall that the last time I was here I was joined by a dear friend, and a giant of American politics, Senator Edward Kennedy. (Applause.) Teddy’s not here right now, but his legacy of civil rights and health care and worker protections is still with us.

I was a candidate for President that day, and some may recall I argued that our country had reached a tipping point; that after years in which we had deferred our most pressing problems, and too often yielded to the politics of the moment, we now faced a choice: We could squarely confront our challenges with honesty and determination, or we could consign ourselves and our children to a future less prosperous and less secure.

I believed that then and I believe it now. And that’s why, even as we’ve tackled the most severe economic crisis since the Great Depression, even as we’ve wound down the war in Iraq and refocused our efforts in Afghanistan, my administration has refused to ignore some of the fundamental challenges facing this generation.

We launched the most aggressive education reforms in decades, so that our children can gain the knowledge and skills they need to compete in a 21st century global economy.

We have finally delivered on the promise of health reform -– reform that will bring greater security to every American, and that will rein in the skyrocketing costs that threaten families, businesses and the prosperity of our nation.

We’re on the verge of reforming an outdated and ineffective set of rules governing Wall Street -– to give greater power to consumers and prevent the reckless financial speculation that led to this severe recession.

And we’re accelerating the transition to a clean energy economy by significantly raising the fuel-efficiency standards of cars and trucks, and by doubling our use of renewable energies like wind and solar power — steps that have the potential to create whole new industries and hundreds of thousands of new jobs in America.

So, despite the forces of the status quo, despite the polarization and the frequent pettiness of our politics, we are confronting the great challenges of our times. And while this work isn’t easy, and the changes we seek won’t always happen overnight, what we’ve made clear is that this administration will not just kick the can down the road.

Immigration reform is no exception. In recent days, the issue of immigration has become once more a source of fresh contention in our country, with the passage of a controversial law in Arizona and the heated reactions we’ve seen across America. Some have rallied behind this new policy. Others have protested and launched boycotts of the state. And everywhere, people have expressed frustration with a system that seems fundamentally broken.

Of course, the tensions around immigration are not new. On the one hand, we’ve always defined ourselves as a nation of immigrants — a nation that welcomes those willing to embrace America’s precepts.

Indeed, it is this constant flow of immigrants that helped to make America what it is. The scientific breakthroughs of Albert Einstein, the inventions of Nikola Tesla, the great ventures of Andrew Carnegie’s U.S. Steel and Sergey Brin’s Google, Inc. – all this was possible because of immigrants… »

Speech can be found at the Washington Wire (click here for full speech transcript):