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e-twinning et Four Winds

Reims-Cyber-Langues 2009

les documents sont disponibles sur le site campus libre dont le lien est ci-dessous dans “commentaires”

http://campus-libre.educoo.org/main/document/document.php?cidReq=ENGLISH

Listen and enjoy!

Do you know what it means to miss New Orleans
And miss it each night & day
I know I am not wrong this feeling´s gettin´ stronger
The longer, I stay away
Miss them moss covered vines the tall sugar pines
Where mockin´ birds used to sing
And I would like to see that lazy Mississippi hurryin´ into spring

The moonlight on the bayou a creole tune that fills the air
I dream about magnolias in bloom & I am wishin´ I was there

Do you know what it means to miss New Orleans
When that is where you left your heart
And theres one thing more I miss the one I care for
More than I miss New Orleans

The moonlight on the bayou a creole tune that fills the air
I dream about magnolias in bloom & I am wishin´ I was there

Do you know what it means to miss New Orleans
When that is where you left your heart
And theres one thing more I miss the one I care for
More more than I miss New Orleans

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BiTxi6SxcaQ&feature=related

I’ve got the blues for yesterday
keeps on holding me
I’ve got the blues for yesterday
keeps on holding me
I’ve got the blues deep down
days that used to be

I like to sit by the fireside
dreaming of the days gone past (2)

one in one of those happy hours
was never meant to last

I’ve got a memory in Chicago
and a memory in New Orleans
memory in saint Louis
come back in my dreams

I’ve got a whole gang of memories
every town it seems
now meet my memories
also fall apart
some bad man got a woman
and the blues got my heart (repeat)

Pronunciation and comprehension Emily Dickinson

There is another sky by Emily Dickinson
There is another sky,
Ever serene and fair,
And there is another sunshine,
Though it be darkness there;
Never mind faded forests, Austin,
Never mind silent fields –
Here is a little forest,
Whose leaf is ever green;
Here is a brighter garden,
Where not a frost has been;
In its unfading flowers
I hear the bright bee hum:
Prithee, my brother,
Into my garden come!

 

Emily Dickinson’s Gingerbread

As transcribed in Emily Dickinson: Profile of the Poet as Cook from Dickinson’s

original manuscript:

1 quart flour

½ cup butter

½ cup cream

1 tablespoon ginger

1 teaspoon soda

1 teaspoon salt

Make up with molasses

The editors of the book add the following about Emily Dickinson’s gingerbread recipe:

Cream the butter and mix with lightly whipped cream. Sift dry ingredients together

and combine with other ingredients. The dough is stiff and needs to be pressed into

whatever pan you choose. A round or small square pan is suitable. The recipe also

fits perfectly into a cast iron muffin pan, if you happen to have one which makes oval

cakes. Bake at 350°F for 20-25 minutes.”

Guides at the Emily Dickinson House, who in 1975 individually experimented with

the quantity of molasses, have generally agreed that a ‘cup or so’ is just about right.”

(p. 15)

Brose, Nancy, Juliana McGovern Dupre, Wendy Tocher Kohler and Jean McClure Mudge,

Emily Dickinson: Profile of the Poet as Cook (Amherst, Massachusetts, ©1976).

http://www.elllo.org/

des textes de compéhension orale et des fiches écrites

http://www.deezer.com/fr/

de la musique dans le respect de la légalité

Mark Bittman ‘s cooking advice…. Yummy! Enjoy!

http://video.nytimes.com/video/playlist/style/the-minimalist/1194811622323/index.html#1194837900594

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